July 30, 2010

River Marked Cover Art

I've seen this pop up hither and yon for awhile and been waiting for the official word to go up over at Hurog.com. It just did and I'm excited to post the cover of the sixth Mercy Thompson novel--River Marked. We knew this one was going to delve a little deeper into Mercy's past, particularly the walker heritage and abilities she inherited from her father. And my little Mercy-loving heart does its little dance of joy at the thought. The cover reflects the Native American ancestry, for sure, and I'm noticing lots of feathers in her tattoos as well. Interesting. Personally I like that cover artist Dan Dos Santos subtly changes her tattoos with each cover to match the tones and themes of the individual books themselves. So what do you think?

And if you haven't read this article over at Tor, in which Dos Santos and the real-life Mercy cover model Jaime talk about the creation process, I highly recommend you do. I had no idea there was an actual cover model and their remarks are so interesting.

Retro Friday Review: Star of the Morning by Lynn Kurland

Retro Friday is a weekly meme hosted here at Angieville and focuses on reviewing books from the past. This can be an old favorite, an under-the-radar book you think deserves more attention, something woefully out of print, etc. Everyone is welcome to join in at any time! I include roundups from participating bloggers in my post every week.
I had never read anything by Lynn Kurland prior to picking up Star of the Morning. I had never even heard of her before, due to the fact that she writes primarily historical romance and I just rarely find myself reading in that genre. But my eye caught on the cover as I walked through the romance aisle at Borders to get to the fantasy/scifi section. And something made me pause. It's always that dangerous pause that gets you, isn't it? If the book can just get a toehold on my attention, I'm so often a goner. I reach out, picked it up, and read the back and wondered. It's a fairly dreamy, idealized cover and not exactly my favorite. But I liked that it was just the girl and her sword. And when I saw the word "mercenary" on the back I just sort of knew I would like her. And perhaps she doesn't always wear flowing garments of blue. So I took it home with me and am so glad I did. Because this is an absolutely delightful series and one that deserves a wider readership. Star of the Morning is the first in the Nine Kingdoms trilogy. It was published just four years ago and both of the other two books are also out in paperback so now is really the perfect time to jump in and give it a shot. It's straight-up high fantasy, with a nice romance tucked in there and very deft, wonderful writing. 


Morgan of Melksham is not pleased. After putting in her time, serving years as an elite mercenary, she is reduced to messenger status. As a favor to her old friend and mentor Sir Nicholas, she agrees to deliver a sword of some note to the King of Neroche. Mystified as to why it should have anything to do with her, Morgan is somewhat mollified to be joined by a few of her longtime compatriots. To balance this out, however, she is also joined by an annoyingly pompous lad by the name of Adhemar and--shortly thereafter--by his somewhat less pompous younger brother Miach. Together, the assorted companions set out to see the blade safely to its rightful owner. And Morgan is forced to bite her tongue and see the job through, despite her lifelong hatred of all things magical and her legendary inability to suffer fools (such as Adhemar) gladly. Miach, on the other hand, becomes a friend. With his easy manner and utterly unrefined approach to life, he manages to make stoic Morgan smile, even laugh once or twice. And the journey seems somehow less taxing with him along. But their task becomes more urgent as they encounter various ominous portents along the way. Something--something dark--is seeping across the border into Neroche. And the only hope the king has is getting that sword into the hands of its destined wielder. If Morgan and her friends don't make it in time, all hell might literally break loose.


The writing is what first made a favorable impression on me. It's honestly so light and sinuous that you don't even notice it. In the best way, it propels the story forward, never standing out garishly or halting along blandly. It allows the characters to stand out and shine. And they really do. Morgan is often frustrated and cranky at her present lot in life. Beautiful and ruthless, she has trouble dealing with those more frivolous and less dedicated than she is. But there is a history there as well. So many interesting questions as to how she ended up with the life that she did. Why she was raised by Sir Nicholas and why he sent her on this quest. It all amounts to the reader not really believing her gruff exterior and happily so. Then there is Miach. And Miach is perfectly delightful from top to bottom. If you don't like Miach, there might be something wrong with you. It is a pleasure watching him exasperatedly deal with his windbag brother at the same time as he plies sword-for-hire Morgan with jokes and compliments and attempts to get her to relax for one minute. This is a proper quest tale and, as I am a fan of such when they are well done, I loved going along for the ride. The characters are witty and up for anything and the world itself is twisty and turny and full of a long history of alternately dastardly and noble rulers. No one is exactly who they say they are, of course. And it all builds up to a very startling climax. Just when you think what you were hoping would happen will, in fact, happen--the threads of the tale are flung far and wide across the whole of the Nine Kingdoms and you are left gasping at the implications. I had to wait a year for the sequel. There was grumbling involved. But I will tell you that it was completely and utterly worth it, as  The Mage's Daughter is a worthy successor in every way and sits contentedly on my Beloved Bookshelf. If you haven't run across this series before, I do hope you give it a try. It is a comfort read, uncomplicated but lovely, full of characters who will work their way into your affections. Highly recommended, particularly for fans of Sharon Shinn and Robin McKinley.


Reading Order: Star of the Morning, The Mage's Daughter, and Princess of the Sword


Retro Friday Roundup
Book Harbinger reviews The Unlikely Romance of Kate Bjorkman by Louise Plummer
Charlotte's Library reviews The Grey Horse by R.A. MacAvoy
Emily's Reading Room reviews Princess Academy by Shannon Hale
See Michelle Read reviews The Changeover by Margaret Mahy


Linkage
Book Harbinger Review
Melissa's Bookshelf Review
Reading for Sanity Review

July 29, 2010

In Which Richard Armitage Reads Georgette Heyer

Be still, my beating heart.

It all started yesterday, when I ran across Becky's review of Venetia. I always enjoy Becky's reviews and I eagerly clicked on this one as I have yet to read any Georgette Heyer books and had decided a few months ago that Venetia would be my first--and then promptly never got around to it. My eyes didn't even make it to the beginning of the review, however, as they caught on Becky's statement at the top that the version she read was actually the audio book as narrated by Richard Armitage.

Ahem.

A little quick investigating revealed that NAXOS AudioBooks has released two Georgette Heyer books narrated by Richard Armitage. The first was Sylvester, the second Venetia, and a third is on the way in August. These are abridged versions, which is unfortunate, but Becky mentioned in her excellent review that she read the book itself first and then listened to the audio book and they were both wonderful experiences. And the awesome thing is NAXOS has an excerpt up on their site you can listen to. And you really must. I turned it on in the background and continued to work on several other tasks on my computer. I ended up, hands in my lap, gazing at the screen blankly, listening to the sound of his voice. I think I may have just added another item to my wishlist. The question is: what else do you think we could get him to read?

July 28, 2010

Darkest Mercy Cover Art

I know you've likely seen this cover already, but it's frankly too pretty not to post. Also, it's Donia. And I love Donia. This is the cover for Darkest Mercy--the fifth and final book in Melissa Marr's Wicked Lovely series.
And just for fun, I thought I'd post all five covers side by side here now, both to show the arc of truly lovely cover art for a series, and to try to determine which one is my favorite.
First of all--so pretty. This series has just had consistently gorgeous covers and I love seeing that, especially for a series I've followed and enjoyed (I should say that has inspired the full range of human emotions in me--which can only be a good thing--even when I'm railing against some bit of nonsense Keenan got himself up to). Second, as far as my favorite goes, it's definitely down to either the cover of Ink Exchange or the one for Darkest Mercy. I love them both. But I think, I think, I'm gonna have to go with Ink Exchange. Because it's Leslie. And it's Irial's tattoo. Coming alive. And I love the imagery, the  book, and those characters so much they will always hold a special place in my affections. So bring on Darkest Mercy, Ms. Marr. I cannot wait to see how you wrap the whole thing up.

Wednesday Giggles: Sparklepire Version

It's that time of year again. We welcome the wonderful Cleolinda's Eclipse in 15 Minutes. I laughed helplessly over her version of New Moon last December, and her Harry Potter parodies--especially The Prisoner of Azkaban in 15 Minutes--are screamingly funny. If you've seen Eclipse already, I do recommend going to read Cleo's version immediately. For all your sparklepush and the wereshove needs. Happy Wednesday!

Oh, and if you saw the film (as I did), what'd you think?

July 27, 2010

My Favorite Big Bads


A couple of months ago Ty over at The Lit Connection wrote a post on her favorite villains. What made me smile were the reasons she gave for crushing on these dastardly dudes so, among them because a good villain lives forever and because they have the best lines and are known for being the best dressers. You gotta respect those reasons. I started musing about who would make my own list, but the thing is these aren't just bad boys--these are the villains. These are the ones you run from not to. So I was firm with myself. This list must be comprised of characters I love to hate. Not characters I hate, then love. Or fall for in any way. That's not to say that my feelings about them are completely black or white; the best ones inspire a lot of gray. But these are villains and should be treated with utmost caution. So here they are, my top ten big bads, in the order in which I discovered them:

The White Witch
She was one of the first really big bads I ever encountered and her evil has not diminished over time. She made it always winter and never Christmas. She tried to corrupt Edmund and she murdered Aslan. She's horrid. End of story.


IT
Anyone who remembers their first reading of A Wrinkle in Time will readily cringe with me here. This was possibly my first science fiction story and the big, sloppy, white brain sitting in all his awful glory in the CENTRAL Central Intelligence building of Camazotz and trying to take over wonderful Charles Wallace will never stop haunting me.

The Black Rider
Our first equestrian villain. And he is black indeed. Appearing when you least expect him, rearing up on his dark horse, framed by ravens and intent on destroying Will Stanton and everything good, the Black Rider fired up my imagination when I first read The Dark is Rising series and its great battle between Light and Dark.

Cabbarus
Possibly my very favorite Lloyd Alexander villain. He's just so scheming and slippery. You think he's gone for good and then he slithers up like a slimy worm, infesting the whole of Westmark with his insatiable, grasping thirst for power. I love that his reach extends across three whole books and I love watching Theo and Mickle and the gang thwart him.

Mr. Hyde
Seventh grade. I read Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in seventh grade and that one night still sends chills down my spine. The night I read the scene in which Dr. Jekyll feels his face begin to change and I thought to myself--this is real. This isn't just creepy. And I love that Robert Louis Stevenson was able to evoke that feeling in me.

Duke Roger of Conte
You knew Roger would be on this list, didn't you? How could I not include one of my all-time favorite heroine's arch-nemesis? And that's the beautiful thing about Roger. He's Alanna's great enemy. The whole relationship exists on the grand scale and it's wonderful watching Alanna navigate her life "after" Roger. Plus, as Ty would appreciate, the duke's got style in spades.

Madame DeFarge
Arguably the most awesome villain in all of Dickens, Madame Defarge takes vengeance to a whole other level. With her ceaseless knitting needles clicking away, ending a life with every click, she makes me want to go curl up in a corner somewhere with Syndey Carton and hide until the revolution is over. Ruthless and dogged, she is the perfect villain.

Arthur Huntington
I had to include a truly evil husband on the list, didn't I? Well, Arthur Huntington is the brass ring as far as I'm concerned. All smiles and charm and undying love when he proposes to Helen, Huntington slowly evolves into every wife's nightmare as he abuses everything from alcohol to his wife and child. And even after they escape his clutches, his shadow hangs over the novel making the reader and Helen wonder--will we ever be free?


Satan, Paradise Lost
Okay, this is the only instance where we tread on dangerous ground. Because I may or may not have come just the teensiest bit close to falling for this one. I know. I know. But Milton just does such a good job with the whole anti-hero bit. You want to root for him. You do. Fortunately, you come to your senses. Or at least I did. I think. But still. Well played, Mr. Milton. Well played.

Voldemort
Last but certainly not least, the most recent addition to my list. Again with the great nemesis, but Rowling laid it out so perfectly. I've said it before and I'll say it again--I could not have imagined a more satisfying conclusion to such an entertaining series. And a lot of it is what goes down between The Boy Who Lived and this dude. It wouldn't be the same without a bad guy willing to split his soul seven ways from Sunday in order to get what he wants.

So would any of these baddies show up on your list? Who gives you the deep chills?

July 26, 2010

Forget You by Jennifer Echols

I am having difficulty believing it was almost a year ago that I read Going Too Far. It was a solid swallow-in-a-single-gulp read and, I have often thought of Meg's "I am full of fear" mantra and smiled. I'm happy it's received the welcome attention it has in the blogosphere and I knew her next romantic drama would meet with a host of eager readers. When I first read the synopsis for Jennifer Echols' Forget You, I admit I was completely sucked in by the amnesia angle and the whole waking up to find you have a different boyfriend from the boyfriend you thought you had bit. I mean, who's not up for that? So many great possibilities when the protagonist herself doesn't know exactly what's going on. Plus, I enjoyed Ms. Echols' writing quite a bit in Going Too Far. And nearing the end of July as we are, this book was fast starting to sound like the perfect summer read to me and I looked forward to it with a high degree of anticipation.

Zoey works at her dad's water park--Slide with Clyde--along with all seventeen other members of her high school swim team. All except Doug Fox. The boy who did a year in juvie and always seems to give Zoey a hard time. As captain of the swim team, Zoey runs a tight ship in and out of the pool. Her friends respect her and admire her for her work ethic and her seemingly perfectly put together exterior. Then her dad knocks up his 24-year-old human resources manager and Zoey finds herself racing the gossip home to her mother before things get any worse. And for awhile it seems that everything will be all right. Yes, she and her mother are on their own now as her father is going to leap into his midlife crisis with reckless abandon and marry Ashley. In Hawaii, no less. But then Zoey comes home to find her mother unresponsive on the bed next to a dangerously empty bottle of pills. And suddenly her vaunted ability to keep tight control over her life has disappeared without a trace. Forced to move back in with her furious father, while her mother resides indefinitely in a mental institution for evaluation, Zoey tries to exert a modicum of control over her life and decides to sleep with her longtime friend (and player with a capital P) Brandon. The next thing she knows she wakes up in the hospital, having apparently crashed her car after the party. And, even more mystifying, Doug Fox is attached to her hip. The large gap in her memory appears to include several vital things and Zoey is determined to find out what they are.

I'll just go ahead and start by saying that Forget You is an example of another great setup that fell very flat for me. Much of the problem was plotting issues, along with an abundance of confusion throughout the story. So many character traits and decisions just didn't add up and I felt like I was constantly scratching my head, like I was missing more puzzle pieces than poor Zoey. I liked Zoey. I felt incredibly sorry for her. Her mother attempts suicide and then gets locked up in the hospital, where no one will allow Zoey to visit. Her father is like something out of a nightmare and the boys that she lusts after are neither of them anything to write home about. Her commutation of a one-night stand into a full-blown relationship with Brandon can be chalked up to her completely understandably disordered mental state. For awhile. But unfortunately I was only able to suspend my disbelief so long. She knows his reputation. She knows the reality of him. And, smart as she is, it seems beyond unlikely she would persist in such an unbelievably unrealistic scenario, when presented with the lovely young hottie by the name of Doug, who clearly wants her. Yesterday. And despite the fact that she so wants him back, she treats him pretty poorly. And he takes it! I mean, he snarks at her a bit, and definitely tries to get her to see the light. But ultimately he takes it. It was hard for me to keep a torch for Doug burning when he kept turning belly up. And not treating her very nicely either, come to think of it. These two were undeniably drawn to each other, but they didn't seem to much like each other. I have difficulty signing on for that sort of deal. I guess I just need a little more than attraction to go on. I couldn't feel the connection between them, much less want them to be together. They didn't leap across the page at me and their magnetism alone just wasn't enough. And so what I hoped would be an absorbing, sweet read ended up an extremely confusing and fractured one. As evidenced by the links below, some people feel similarly and many do not. If you've not ready any Jennifer Echols yet, I highly recommend starting with Going Too Far and working your way out from there.

Linkage
Book Crazy Review
The Book Smugglers Review
The Crooked Shelf Review
A Good Addiction Review
Lauren's Crammed Bookshelf Review
Lurv a la Mode Review
Pure Imagination Review
See Michelle Read Review
Wondrous Reads Review

July 23, 2010

Retro Friday Review: Blood Red Horse by K.M. Grant

Retro Friday is a weekly meme hosted here at Angieville and focuses on reviewing books from the past. This can be an old favorite, an under-the-radar book you think deserves more attention, something woefully out-of-print, etc. Everyone is welcome to join in at any time! I include roundups from participating bloggers in my post every week. 
How about that cover! That cover had me at hello. With the crusaders coming on and the golden keyhole doorway? The title and tagline--"Two boys. One girl. The adventure of a lifetime"--didn't hurt either. I passed it on an endcap in a bookstore almost exactly four years ago. I actually completed an about face when I saw it, coming to a screeching halt to admire the general loveliness. The book actually came out in 2004, but it took me a couple of years to cotton onto it. I'll tell you one thing though--I didn't leave the bookstore that day without purchasing a copy. Blood Red Horse is the first in the De Granville Trilogy written by Scottish author K.M. Grant. I love a good yarn set during the time of Richard the Lionheart and have run across few really excellent YA versions. This is one of them. Yet I don't think I've ever talked to anyone else who's read this book or the trilogy. It's a shame because it's well written, well researched, and equally appealing to boys and girls as it features such a strong trio of main characters and not a little fighting on the grand scale. When I first read it, the sequel Green Jasper had just come out and so I was able to scarf that one down immediately following this one. It was just as good as, and even more complex than the first.

Gavin and Will de Granville have been battling each other since they came into this world. As the elder brother, Gavin is heir to their father's lands and title and destined to be betrothed to Ellie. An orphan daughter of their father's friend (and an heiress in her own right), Ellie was raised alongside the brothers. She is best friends with easygoing Will and yet has known her whole life she would one day marry prickly Gavin. Taken together, the relationships between these three young people are complicated in the extreme. Then there is Will's horse Hosanna. Deep red in color, with an unusual white star on his forehead, this smallish warhorse captures Will's heart instantly and will be the instrument of bringing so many disparate lives together. When the Crusade enters the picture, another level of fear and uncertainty come into their lives. At seventeen, Will is knighted, Gavin and Ellie are officially betrothed, and the two boys set off with their father Sir Thomas on the adventure of a lifetime, leaving Ellie behind to manage their home at Hartslove and ensure it will still be around for them to return to. If they return at all. In their absence, Ellie learns quite a lot of things the hard way. Among them, the ability to write. And so she begins writing letters to Will, hoping they reach him and bring him some small measure of comfort in a foreign land so very far away. 

Grant tells a ripping good story. A story of the two brothers who went away to war, of the girl they left behind, and of the wonderful warhorse Hosanna. Will and Ellie are only twelve when it begins, and Gavin just a couple of years older. But by the end the three have grown into adulthood and faced the kind of challenges and grief many people twice their age haven't handled. The chapters alternate between Gavin and Will's experiences in the Holy Land, Ellie's struggles at home in England, and the story of a young man named Kamil who is servant to the Saracen leader Saladin and who is destined to have his own encounter with the blood red horse. Because of this structure, the pace never gets tired, and I found myself always eager to find out what was happening on each front. For those of you who are not keen on talking animals or magical beings, never fear. Hosanna neither talks nor shifts nor casts any kind of spell on those around him but that of loyalty and steadfastness. He is certainly the glue that binds them together and he links the young men's different stories quite nicely. The love triangle exists as an undercurrent here, gaining much more momentum and richness in the next volume, which is my favorite. But I love that they are brothers and that the girl they have the good sense to love so much is worth it. Ellie is strong and good and she does what it takes to look after those in her care. She makes the hard decisions and she makes them after taking everything into account. And the brothers are somehow adversarial, unsure, outrageous, and true all at the same time. You think you know who they really are and then they surprise you. This is just a wonderful start to a beguiling trilogy set against a a fascinating and harrowing period of history. It deserves far more attention than it's gotten. 

Reading Order: Blood Red Horse, Green Jasper, and Blaze of Silver


Retro Friday Roundup
Chachic's Book Nook reviews The Changeover by Margaret Mahy      


Linkage
BookMoot Review
Bookwormom Review

July 22, 2010

When Do You Read?

I find myself curious this morning. When do you guys read? When do you find the time? Do you steal it in snippets or chunks? My husband gets asked this question a lot in relation to me. People know I read (a lot) but they also know I work full time, am Mom to two children, and have various and sundry other responsibilities that fill up my life. Naturally, they wonder when I do "all that reading." Aaron's answer is usually, "I have no idea!" The real answer is the obvious answer--late at night. The personal me-time reading comes after the kids are in bed. Of course, I get to read with them every day and, after the little girl goes down, the boy and I get a good, solid chunk of reading in before he gets in bed (and proceeds to read Calvin and Hobbes for another hour or so). Currently we're recklessly plowing our way through Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and honestly it's hard to put it down each night, especially after Harry finishes that second task (last night's chapter) and things are just rushing headlong toward that big, fat climax. So I get to sink into stories with both my kids and that sates my appetite during the daytime and evening hours. Of course, if I'm completely gone on the book I'm reading, I'll slip it out in the car, in the bathroom, and other in-between times to keep my hand in, so to speak, and not lose that oh-so-necessary contact with the characters. But I can't seem to go to sleep at night--no matter how tired I am--if I haven't curled up with my back against the headboard and my knees pulled up, and just read for as long as it takes to make it right. And if it sometimes happens that I reach the point of no return and it's already 2am? Well, I just smile and read straight through to the end. I guess I have to have my uninterrupted chunks and you just can't cheat a book that way, after giving it everything you've got up until that point. The point at which I smile and think to myself, who needs sleep when there are such stories?

So when do you do most of your reading? I'd really love to know.

July 21, 2010

Whiskey Road by Karen Siplin

Whiskey Road is a perfect example of a book I might never have run across were it not for an unexpectedly fortuitous meeting of two like-minded bibliophiles. Herein also lies a lesson on the beaten path. How many times do we walk into the bookstore and head straight for the YA section or the mystery section or the scifi aisle? And we don't venture into other aisles full of different spines and stories. I ran into Karen Siplin on my first trip to BEA and we discovered we have nearly identical taste in reading material. With the possible exception of Richelle Mead's Vampire Academy series. The jury's still out for me on that one. (Team Adrian!) But we became fast friends and I was eager to read her books after heading home again. I picked up Whiskey Road one evening several months ago not knowing what to expect and in the mood for something different and involving and good. Happily, it turned out to be everything I hoped it would be.

All Jimi Anne Hamilton wants is to set out on her BMW motorcycle--just herself and her gear--and ride across the country. From California back to her native New York, she's taking a much-needed break from all the chasing and the scandal and the constant hounding of her life as a paparazza and she's going to watch the scenery fly by and see if she can calm down a little. Then she crashes her bike and a  thief steals both her bike and her camera equipment shortly after. Beaten and bruised, Jimi manages to escape with her life and a bag of stolen money intact. Now officially a shambles, she winds up in a small town in upstate New York in dire need of a place to stay and recuperate before meeting up with her brother and his wife and the messy questions that will no doubt follow. Caleb Atwood lives in this small town and, when no one else seems interested in helping the outsider out, he surprises himself by offering her a ride to the nearest bed and breakfast. Against her better judgement, Jimi reluctantly accepts and thus begins their story. As he is the only person she knows in this unsettlingly small town, Jimi just keeps running into Caleb. And, once she takes the time to look beyond his rather pedestrian contractor exterior, she can see that she's not the only one who's taken a few knocks in her life. And maybe it wouldn't kill her to stay a little longer than she had planned.

I read this book over the course of three nights and every night I set it down reluctantly and looked forward all day the next day to being able to pick it up again. Karen Siplin creates a wonderfully quiet and real tone throughout this story in which opposites attract. And I think that's what drew me in the most. There was a decided lack of fake tension or manufactured scenarios and, most importantly, there was time. Time for me as the reader to fall into company with these characters and feel like I understood them and cared what happened to them. And I did. I really did. I think it takes guts to make your protagonist a member of the paparazzi. And an unrepentant one at that. It's a hard, gritty, at times questionable life and everyone around Jimi looks down on her for choosing it as her profession. But it's not what matters to Caleb. When she limps into that diner that first day, everyone else sees the color of her skin and the state of her leathers, but he sees her strength and her individuality. To him she seems somehow above or apart from the usual humdrum of his lackluster life. He wants to know her rather than judge her. For Jimi's part, she struggles not to judge Caleb and all of the backwater rural New York denizens of his fusty town. Used to a fast pace and city life, but hampered by her injuries and basically being at the end of her rope, Jimi is forced to stop racing and take some time. What happens when they both look beyond their usual blinders is extremely sweet and endearing, without ever feeling forced or overly implausible. And the ending is even better. Not tied up with a bow, not unrealistic in its perfection, but touched with just the right amount of maturity, rightness, and possibility. It by no means needs one, but I would read a sequel in a heartbeat. Recommended for fans of Jennifer Cruisie and Julie James.


Linkage
ChickLitGurrl Interview
MCPL Reader's Roost Review