January 26, 2015

Review | Every Breath by Ellie Marney

Teenage Sherlock Holmes, Watson is a girl, and the story is told from her perspective. This is essentially all the information I needed in order to make the decision to dive into Every Breath at the earliest opportunity. But in case you're wavering, it's also fun to know that this is Australian author Ellie Marney's debut novel, that it is a YA contemporary mystery, and the first in a series to boot. Next up, I think we should just take a moment to talk covers. I have yet to purchase my own copy (that's earmarked for the next paycheck), but both the US (seen here) and Aussie covers have a lot going for them. The Aussie one gets tons of points for having Watts actually on the cover, for one thing. But in a very rare move, I'm leaning US if only because it's not a photo of actual people (never works out well for me) and because, well, his throat. Also his hair and his entire posture. But his throat. That's Mycroft. I love him this cover.

Rachel Watts' friendship with her neighbor James Mycroft is something of a full time job. Newly (and unwillingly) arrived from the countryside, Rachel struggles to find a place for herself in Melbourne. Unused to navigating city life after the loss of the family farm, she and her older brother and parents find themselves acting almost like strangers as they adjust to their new home and environment. But then Mycroft enters her life, with his jittery brilliance, his obsession with forensics, and his ongoing allergy to school. And soon her days are not quite as numb, filled as they are with contributing her powers of observation (and cooking skills) to the latest in a long line of Mycroft's investigations. But this most recent involves a murder. And not just any stranger, but that of Homeless Dave—a man they both knew. Unable to accept the official police verdict, Mycroft and Watts set themselves to the task of tracking down the truth behind Dave's violent death and bringing the mysterious killer to justice.

I'll admit, I was a little nervous at first. I was nervous the high school setting, and possibly the nature of the relationship between Watts and Mycroft, would pall too quickly or somehow not resonate with me in just the right way. As nerves go, basically your run of the mill stuff. But I've read one fantastic Sherlock Holmes adaptation and I was so keen to find another. Happily, Rachel herself was the first to set me at ease. Her transition to the city has been a particularly difficult one, and the dry but upfront way in which she expressed that difficulty struck a chord of sympathy within me:
I like it in his room—the starry lights, the feeling of sanctuary. I'm still not used to dealing with a lot of other people. I've known Mycroft, and Mai and her boyfriend, Gus, since last November, and they still feel like "a lot of other people." Actually, Mycroft alone could probably qualify as seeming like "a lot of other people." He does so much crazy stuff you could imagine more than a single offender.
That passage could just as easily been an entry from one of my high school journals. Other people, man. Not for the faint of heart. I love that the story is told from Watts' perspective. She has very honed powers of observation, though she herself might decry that claim. But it means that not only is she vital to Mycroft's ongoing efforts, she also does an incredibly effective job of introducing the reader to her singular friend. And if her focus is more frequently drawn to to Mycroft than it is anyone else in the room, it isn't any wonder as his magnetism and zaniness and pain fairly claw their way off the page. Gratefully, his presence never overshadows Watts. Not even a little bit, as we are firmly grounded inside her viewpoint and know just how hard she works to keep everyone in her life afloat and not lose track of her own needs, even if she is reticent about voicing them aloud. The mystery itself makes for a fun, often dark ride, and I enjoyed sitting back and accompanying them in their rounds. But the heart of Every Breath is, without question, the chemistry between Watts and Mycroft. Ms. Marney quite simply nails their need on the head. The pacing and development of Watts-and-Mycroft is one long and delicious thread running alongside the unfolding of the murder investigation. As the precarious hold they each have on their lives begins to unravel against the backdrop of Watts' uncertainty and Mycroft's desperation, the solace they take in being together, the rightness of their fit, is so soothing it is tangible. I currently have the sequel on order from Australia and am sitting here feeling antsy just thinking about what these two might be getting up to without me.


Buy

Linkage
Bookish Antics - "Those who love BBC’s Sherlock should definitely check out Every Breath."
Cuddlebuggery - "T
he quippy dialogue is fantastic."
Love is Not a Triangle - "
This book is a winner."

The Midnight Garden - "This book is a wonderful swirl of atmospheric, gritty mystery and Aussie contemporary and SHIPPY SHIP."
My Friends are Fiction - "The real driving force for me in this book was the relationship between Mycroft and Watts."
There Were Books Involved - "I ship it so hard."

January 22, 2015

Review | Fool Me Twice by Meredith Duran

I started a Meredith Duran book some time ago and stalled out early on for reasons I can no longer quite remember. I know it wasn't the writing, which definitely struck me as adept. I think it was more to do with the setting and I not clicking. Also the sense I was getting that the characters were going to hurt each other—possibly at some length—before they found any middle ground. Either way, I wasn't up for it at the time. And then I'm fairly certain I went on to mix Ms. Duran up with Tessa Dare and forgot to return after trying and sort of spectacularly failing to engage with Dare's Spindle's Cove series. Which is why I'm very glad Fool Me Twice was brought to my attention a few days ago. It jogged my memory and I remembered I'd always meant to go back and investigate Duran's work further to see if there might be a better fit among her backlist. As it turns out, her most recent novel and I were destined to get on in spades.

Olivia Mather has set her scruples aside in favor of staying alive. With her mother's husband's dangerous henchman lurking around every dark corner, she decides to use the only weapon she has and infiltrate the home of the Duke of Marwick. As a maid in the duke's home, she feels certain it won't take her above a week to root out his correspondence containing the evidence she needs to ensure the villainous Bertram will leave her alone for good. When she accidentally stumbles into the role of housekeeper, Olivia figures so much the better. But it quickly becomes clear that the home she has walked into is not so easily navigable as she presumed. For the duke is rumored to have run mad at the revelation of his dead wife's betrayal. He has not left his room in above a year. His terrified servants tiptoe about the house and shirk their duties. With time running short and her only hope residing in the duke's rooms, Olivia must take charge of the crumbling household and find a way to lure the crumbling man inside out into the light.

As you know, I can never resist a Beauty and the Beast tale and Fool Me Twice situates itself nicely in the genre with a wonderfully game, feisty heroine and a decidedly bitter, wounded beast. The novel itself is a study in contrasts. Duran's writing is light, often taking an elegant turn. The characters enjoy sparring with one another—verbally, physically, emotionally—you name it. There is much wit and teasing. But. These high and light emotions often run unchecked into much darker fare. Olivia and Marwick excel at demolishing one another, raging beautifully when the thread of their connection dances too close to the gaping lesions they so ferociously protect. While Alistair's injuries are clearly the fresher, Olivia makes a rather shattering command decision not to sidestep her goal in order to save him additional pain. The results are . . .  well, devastating for both of them. And I'm really not sure who I was more angry with. Or who I ached for more. I just wanted them to wash their hands of the pain of their pasts and agree to stop pouring salt into old wounds. An example of the light:
"Have you a death wish?" he snarled. "Or have you, perhaps, lost the ability to understand English?"

She backed away from him, angling toward the door. He matched her step for step, prowling like a lion on the scent of a lamb—not a comfortable analogy. But these innocent books. She was stumbling over them, gilt-edged, calfskin-bound, priceless. She must save them from him.

She had one foot out the door when she caught sight again of the illustrated manuscript. She could not abandon it here. The poor darling! She lunged forward and snatched it up.

"Put that down!" he roared.

"You may keep them all," she cried. "Move the entire library up here, but you will not keep them on the floor!"

She hopped backward and pulled the door shut in his face.
The dark:
It was no longer clear to him who was in control of this conversation. How absurd. He was not bound by her terms; in return for her answer, she could demand the moon, and it would make no difference to him. "Very well, then, answer me: why were you crying?"

"Because I am not the person I hoped to be. And I dislike myself for it."

That told him nothing. "What do you mean? Who had you hoped to be?"

"Someone better. Someone who abided by her ideals."

Christ. Blackly amused, he turned away from her toward the bookshelves. "Then we both were drawn here by the same mood. But I assure you, Mrs. Johnson, you will overcome your disappointment."

"As you have?"

He ignored that. "Good night to you."

"You haven't yet answered my question."

"Welshing," he said coldly, "is the duke's special privilege."

"Very well, don't answer. But I will ask it anyway: why do you read Austen if you lack all hope for yourself? Why torment yourself with happy endings if you don't believe one is possible?"

He stared at the books. This had gone too far. Why did she think she had the right to speak to him in this manner?

Why did he constantly invite it?

"You have every advantage." Her voice was fervent. "There is no reason you can't go back into the world, have everything you feel you've been denied. I tell you—if I had your advantages, I would remake myself!"
And the elegant:
Olivia took a long breath. It now sounded as if Marwick was banging things against the walls. Not his head, she hoped? Or perhaps she did. No, she couldn't wish harm to his brain. It might yet heal, and it had once been very fine.
One of my favorite aspects of the narrative is how it continually refers to what has been lost for both of these individuals, engaging with the agonizing question of whether or not those things can (or should) be regained. To say nothing of how far they will go to stave off danger (in Olivia's case) and exact revenge (in Marwick's). Duran's style, setup, and execution requires the reader be rooting for both Olivia and Marwick in order to make it through the utter hell they hand each other on an hourly basis. In order to reach the point where their eyes finally open enough to see beyond the surface implications of their actions, which are admittedly questionable in a number of cases. I wondered a moment or two whether I might lose my grip on my affection for one of them. But then I do like my protagonists flawed. And I am not at all certain I would have responded to Olivia if she had been a little less ruthless or Marwick had he been a little more malleable. And because their innate admiration for each other is unwavering, I remained with them lo, unto the end. Fool Me Twice is a decided highlight among historicals and of my reading year thus far.

Buy

Linkage
Dear Author - "I don’t often get the intense reads I adore in such a well constructed form."
Fiction Vixen - "
Ms. Duran has given her readers another wonderful, captivating love story."

Love Saves the World - "Her stories always pack an emotional wallop."
Miss Bates Reads Romance - " . . . 
a sensitivity to the class issues of the day, a complex heroine, a flawed and compelling hero, wondrously good writing . . . "

Smexy Books - "While I did get into their romance, I ended the book not 100% convinced they would be happy together forever."

January 19, 2015

Choose Your Own Edition: The Ruby in the Smoke

This Choose Your Own Edition comes to you via my thus far failed attempts to foist a copy of The Ruby in the Smoke off on my friend Beth. The Sally Lockhart series is my favorite of Pullman's work, and I am just so eager for her to read that first incomparable line. My own copy is currently on loan in a different city and won't be returning soon. I did run across an older library copy for sale with a somewhat dismaying pale blue 90s cover and naturally turned my nose up at it (I did go back later but it was gone, naturally). Full disclosure: I am such a snob sometimes about the cover that accompanies someone's first impression of a book I love. Honestly, someone needs to beat it out of me. It's the reason I own three editions of Sunshine and yet only ever loan out one (my favorite first edition), so that new readers come into the experience with the right (IMHO) packaging. SIGH


In any event, with no copies ready to hand, I've been browsing editions online and require your input. I actually like all three of these, though I am drooling rather most over that one on the left—a gorgeous new UK 30th anniversary edition. They've done the whole series, of course, and I . . . well, I need them all. My own copies are beloved and mismatched and the only cover of mine I really love is the first one. Because the Sally on it is Sally. And because it's smoky and threatening and atmospheric in just the right way. But I do like the sort of Dickensian Scholastic cover in the middle above (out of print, but fairly cheaply available), as well as the font and the red framing of the one on the right. And so. Which one would you gift had you the spare cash and the inclination?

January 16, 2015

Review | Girl Before a Mirror by Liza Palmer

First review of the year, guys. I hereby promise you I chose a good one. In fact, I really feel as though I have exercised great restraint in waiting this long to review it. Due out in just under two weeks now, I decided I could wait no longer. It's not that I haven't made my feelings about Liza Palmer's books abundantly clear, because I know that I have. It's that her latest novel—Girl Before a Mirror—is so good it's giving her others a run for their money as my favorite (and I honestly didn't think my love for Nowhere But Home could be surpassed). So good I've already reread it once and am fending off a second reread even as I type this. There are other books out there, and they all deserve a chance. I know this, and I feel their call keenly. But. I had supreme difficulty letting go of this one, and I can see myself diving back in regularly and indefinitely just to spend time with these characters again and to experience Anna's hilarious and thoughtful journey along with her once more. It was just as good the second time around, and I know it will only wear better with time.

Anna Wyatt finds herself in the unenviable position of not having a clue what to wish for as she blows out the candle on her 40th birthday. Surrounded by her friends, their spouses, and her beloved (if beleaguered) younger brother Ferdie, Anna feels affectionate but a bit blank. A year into a self-imposed dating sabbatical, she's been taking stock of her life and cleaning house of anything (or anyone) extraneous. The result is she finds herself in an undeniably clean, but somewhat sterile place, in need of inspiration and not sure where to look. Hoping to advance at the ad agency where she works, she tracks down Lumineux Shower Gel—a dying product in need of revival. Saddled with hopeful newbie graphic designer/sidekick Sasha, Anna finds inspiration in the unlikely form of Sasha's well-read copy of bestselling romance novelist Helen Brubaker's new self-help book Be the Heroine, Find Your Hero. And before they know it, Anna and Sasha are on their way to Arizona and the annual RomanceCon. Pairing up with the con and Ms. Brubaker herself, Anna and Sasha wind up judging the Mr. RomanceCon competition, with the winner slated to be the new spokesman for Lumineux Shower Gel. Determined to seal the deal and make it out of Romance Land alive, Anna is in no way prepared for the exuberance of the convention, the viciousness of the Arizona heat, and the charming Britishness of one Mr. Lincoln Mallory with his blue oxford cloth shirts and his steady gaze.

The thing about Liza Palmer's protagonists is that they're all so very different, from each other and from me. They're in advertising, and they're pastry chefs, they work in prisons or in art restoration. And yet they are so very real, so full of the same questions and vague but earnest hopes and fears that I feel on a daily basis. And so we are comrades. And I care. I care so much from the very start. And Anna Wyatt, with her self-control and her clever mind and her Miss Marple Theory, was no exception. I had her back from page one, as she gazed around at the faces of her friends and tried not to let the gathering uncertainty show on her face. Her story is so compelling because it addresses, so humorously and with unadorned frankness, questions of control, empowerment, guilt, success, and love. Add in some seriously wonderful explorations of female friendship and sibling love and one truly epic romance convention, and you have got the kind of tale I couldn't look away from if my life depended on it. And then . . . there's Lincoln Mallory, who I love so much I start to drift when I think about him too closely. With those oxford cloth shirts and those tense hands in his pockets. At one point there are suspenders involved and . . . well. You'll meet him on your own, but here is one of my favorite of their hilarious and charming exchanges:
I stand in the lobby, flipping my phone around in my hands. I pull Lincoln's business card out of my purse. Again. I flip the card over and dial. My fingers are tingling and this terrified numbness pings throughout my body, settling in my toes. I swallow. And swallow. Blink my eyes. It's like I'm giving myself errands to run around my body so I won't—

"This is Lincoln Mallory." Vomit.

"Hey, hi. It's Anna. Anna Wyatt from the other night. From the . . . um . . . from the elevator? And the apple . . . breakfast time—"

"I'm going to stop you there, love. I know who you are even without the reminder of apple breakfast time," he says. His voice is even better than I remember it.

"I apologize for my late call," I say, still not having taken a breath now going on nine minutes.

"I assumed you were busy at your Booty Ball." Lincoln Mallory saying booty will go down in history as one of my favorite things in the world.

"You still hungry?" I ask.

"I've already eaten, but I did manage to get something for dessert."

"And what's that then?"

"It's a surprise," he says. My face flushes. "When your Booty Ball ran long—a sentence I never thought I'd say, quite frankly—I had to strike out on the field trip on my own."

"So you're holding this dessert hostage."

"You make it sound so devious."

I scan the lobby. The hotel bar. The kiss. I close my eyes.

And leap.

"What's your room number?"

"409."

"I'll be right up."

"Cheers," he says.

"But just for dessert."

"I do like a woman with her priorities in order." Silence. "Anna?"

"I didn't know if you'd hung up," I say.

"I hadn't."

"Right."

"But I will now."

"Sure. Okay," I say. Silence. "Hello?"

"It's never not funny, is it?"

"I mean . . . ," I say, unable to keep from laughing.
These two. I mean. And it's always like this with them. The entire time I was reading I alternated between helpless laughter and a sort of fierce longing for their fears to be allayed, for their paths to somehow continue intersecting despite . . . everything. Because, of course, Lincoln's history is as mesmerizing and complicated as Anna's, and I felt every ounce of their combined and individual uneasiness and wanting. It is endlessly relieving to read about characters you would genuinely want to know, would want to sit with in a hotel bar or on a Manhattan sidewalk and just talk to. And I will never not appreciate how these two said what they wanted to, even if it came out mangled and fumbling, how they pursued their truth with an intentness I admire. For example:
I shut the car off and take a second, the blistering heat sitting on the top of my head like I'm under a heat lamp. I am walking toward the meet and greet when the phone rings.

"Anna Wyatt," I say, knowing exactly who it is without even looking at the screen.

"This is my formal apology," Lincoln says.

"Go ahead then," I say.

"I'm sorry." I like that Lincoln doesn't elaborate or get lost in a maze of buts and excuses for why what he did was actually okay. A simple I'm sorry is the most beautiful thing in the world.

"Thank you," I say.
It's these simple, thoughtful moments that make me pause as I'm reading to mark their effect (and possibly read them aloud to the nearest warm body so that I'm not alone in my wonder). Girl Before a Mirror is filled with them. I've decided the only way to start a new year is with an instant and permanent resident on my beloved bookshelf. Done and done.

Girl Before a Mirror is due out January 27th.


Buy

Linkage
Love is Not a Triangle - "I'm not sure I can even articulate how amazing and affirming this book was for me."

January 15, 2015

All New (to Me) Pretties

The first pretties post of the year! And really, these three definitely live up to the name. They are also new to me. I've never read anything by any of these authors, which thought fills me with hope. Have you? If so, do tell me about their words and how they use them.

Between the Notes by Sharon Huss Roat
A young pianist whose family's reduced circumstances force a move to the wrong side of town decides to try to hide the truth from her new associates (including the boy at school and the boy next door). I think we can all guess how well that goes. That cover, though. Also pianist.
Due out June 16th

Made You Up by Francesca Zappia
Schizophrenic protagonist who is dead set on surviving her illness and making it to college with the help of her little sister, her camera, and a Magic 8 ball. Also, possibly (hopefully), a boy named Miles. I love everything about that cover and setup.
Due out May 19th

The Improbable Theory of Ana & Zak by Brian Katcher
Two teens encounter each other and some seriously good cosplay at a scifi convention. Geek antics ensue. I'm actually surprised this story hasn't been written before (or at least come across my radar if it has). And, somewhat ubiquitous title aside (also, is it just me or is Zak being used everywhere lately?), I'm all in.
Due out May 19th

January 14, 2015

Interview with Rose Lerner + Giveaway!

I'm so lucky to have discovered Rose Lerner's books just over four years ago now in the form of her debut novel In for a Penny. Since then, I have eagerly anticipated each of her releases. And today I'm so pleased to be a part of the blog tour for her upcoming release True Pretenses. I had the good fortune to read an early copy for review and I can tell you it's giving A Lily Among Thorns a run for its money as my favorite of all Rose's books! No small feat, that. If you're new to the series, be sure to check out the first Lively St. Lemeston bookSweet Disorder—which is currently on sale for just 99 cents! And now without further ado, please welcome Rose Lerner!


First things first: A thief hero! From Robin Hood to Megan Whalen Turner’s Eugenides, I adore a good rogue. What made you decide to make Ash a con man, and do you have a few of your own favorite fictional thieves?

Me too! I've always been especially fascinated by the skill/craftsmanship aspects like safecracking, pickpocketing, forging and lockpicking. Until seeing it again a few years ago, literally the only thing I remembered into adulthood about the Last Unicorn movie was Schmendrick picking the lock on the unicorn's cage.  

I decided to make Ash a con man because I watched a movie called "The Brothers Bloom" in which Mark Ruffalo plays a con artist who raised his little brother and they have an intense, unhealthily codependent relationship and BAD THINGS HAPPEN. I was heartbroken and I wanted to fix it. So I did. :)

A few favorite fictional thieves: the crew from Leverage, Bunny and Raffles, Moist von Lipwig from the Discworld series, Aladdin, George from the Alanna books. My devious little angels! And a favorite historical romance is Joanna Bourne's My Lord and Spymaster, in which the heroine was raised as a street thief.

Your books were actually the first historical romances I ever read and reviewed, and I remain fascinated by other romance readers’ points of entry. When did you start reading romance, and which book and/or author did you first fall for hard?

Oh, that’s so cool! I started reading Regency romances when I was 12 or 13. I was doing a career-mentorship program and my middle school matched me up with a very kind local writer, who offered to introduce me to a published author she knew. That happened to be Regency romance author Carola Dunn, and I got one of her books out of the library as interview prep.

(My mom used to read Regencies back in the 70s—she started again when I did—and I remember her trying to explain to me what they were: 'A lot of times someone gets kidnapped, or they get sick and need to be nursed back to health...')

A dozen romances or so later, I was hooked and scouring the shelves for books with similar covers. My favorite of hers was Miss Jacobson's Journey, about a Jewish woman, an earl, and a Talmudic-scholar-turned-adventurer smuggling Rothschild gold for Wellington's payroll through France and across the Pyrenees. There's a love triangle, derring-do, and lots of bad hotel food.

The Lively St. Lemeston books comprise your first series, if I’m not mistaken. How differently did you approach a series of connected stories as opposed to your previous standalones? And how many books do we have to look forward to?

The books are very loosely linked, so there isn't much interconnected plotting that needs to happen. The main difference is that I already have a certain degree of familiarity with the world when I start writing a new story, which helps jumpstart things for me. And I need to keep track of continuity, so I have a series bible for the first time ever.

When I finished Sweet Disorder, I wasn't planning for it to be a series. I was actually working on a smuggling story (I still hope to write that book one day), and while discussing it at RWA with an editor, she asked me, "Could it be in a series with Sweet Disorder?" I just didn't see how. "Well, could they take place in the same town?"

Hmm. I had gotten fond of Lively St. Lemeston. Why not set more books there? The smuggling story needed an isolated coastline and general eerie atmosphere, but I had just come up with the idea for True Pretenses, and since Ash was a traveling con artist, there was no reason he couldn't come to Lively St. Lemeston. Suddenly the story started to flesh itself out and I was really, really excited. So I would like to thank that editor!

I tend to respond favorably to protagonists who have their backs against the wall, literally and/or figuratively. Lydia and Ash felt particularly kindred spirits to me, with the weight (or lack thereof) of family history on their shoulders, their hopes for and frustrations with their younger brothers, and their own unexpected association. Can you tell us a little more of what makes these two tick and what changes for them when they enter each other’s lives?

Me too! I like stakes to be high. That doesn’t necessarily mean objectively high, like life and death or the fate of nations or anything, but I want them to feel high to the protagonists (I am a sucker for fate-of-the-family-restaurant stories, for example).

Both Ash and Lydia took on “adult” responsibilities very young, raising their little brothers from babies (Lydia with help from her father, Ash on his own). They’ve focused most of their emotional energy on their siblings, partly as a way of shoving their own childhood grief and loneliness to the back burner. Ash imagines that he and his brother Rafe will be con artist partners for the rest of their lives, and Lydia plans for her brother Jamie to eventually take over from their father Lord Wheatcroft as Tory patron of Lively St. Lemeston, with her as his hostess and partner.

So when Rafe announces that he wants to go straight, and Jamie announces shortly after Lord Wheatcroft’s death that he doesn’t plan to pursue politics, both Ash and Lydia have serious empty nest syndrome. It’s as if, as well as threatening these close relationships and career choices, the change snatches their entire identities from them. I think they need each other to remind them that they are whole people, even without the roles and responsibilities they’ve taken on.

What is one book and/or series (from any genre) you’ve been gushing about nonstop lately?

A Bollywood Affair. OMG SO GOOD. The heroine is adorable and heartbreaking, the hero's angsty backstory was incredibly effective. Every trope was used so perfectly. Plus I love a romance where food is important. Read it, but make sure you have snacks around when you do.

And just for fun, what’s the first word that comes to mind when I say:

It's funny, I'm not good at this...I get flashes of images, not words. So I'm describing the image that popped into my head instead.


Lydia: pansies. They're such a quiet, self-contained, but vivid flower.
Books: the stack of research books falling over under my night-table.
Delicious: a Martha Stewart Living-style food photograph that appears to be some kind of puff pastry dough square with ham in it?
Ash: a wrinkled button-down under a rumpled suit jacket. Yes, I know they didn't have button-downs in the Regency.
Romance: two people laughing by a fountain in Central Park. Wow, my brain is embarrassing.
Writing: my composition notebook.
Hero:  a dapper cartoon character with dark hair falling in his eyes and Edwardian evening dress.
Sexy: chocolate and a bright color palette like Star Trek: TOS or the con artist TV show Hustle.
Love: a group of people watching TV together.
Home: my home. :)

Thanks so much, Rose!

Thanks for having me!


***

And now for the giveaway! Rose is offering an ebook of True Pretenses to one lucky reader. To enter, fill out the Rafflecopter. The giveaway will run one week from today (1/21). Good luck!

January 13, 2015

Tuesday Giggles: David Tennant Version


I haven't seen any Broadchurch yet, but I giggled my way through this absolutely on point narration. Because David Tennant.