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Reader and Raelynx by Sharon Shinn

This is the fourth book in Shinn's Twelve Houses series. Each volume focuses on one of the six companions and this one follows the youngest--Cammon. The boy who reads souls. Heretofore, Cammon has been something of a delightful enigma. The scruffy little brother with a good heart, not an ounce of tact, and the ability to gauge a person's true intentions. In this volume, he comes into his own and it was a treat to be one up on the rest of the characters for once. To actually be inside his head. Cammon is still Cammon, but we do get a little more information on his background and abilities as a reader. When he is chosen to assess the true intentions of Princess Amalie's suitors, the inevitable humorous and dangerous consequences follow. In fact, this was the most predictable of the four novels so far. Although I was surprised (and perfectly delighted) with how much of it was Senneth's story. She is my favorite character and, in the end, all the books are about Senneth, the people she gathers around her, and the ways in which she binds them together. As in Mystic & Rider, her sheer strength took my breath away. Now that I think about it, it makes sense that we get so much of Senneth in this book as it becomes clearer and clearer as the story goes on how much Cammon relies on her. How, even when he disagrees with her logic, she has come to fill a space in his life that was empty until she walked into the tavern and freed him with a swipe of her knife. As always, Shinn's strength is her dialogue and her strong characters. They leap, gleefully and disreputably, off the page, making me wish I knew them. Wish I could talk with them and watch their faces. Become familiar and chummy with them. Until I was one of them. One of the six. No, seven now. That's the sign of a good book. That's the reason I'll read anything she writes. That, and finally having the satisfaction of watching Tayse cleave Halchon Gisseltess in half without blinking an eye. The good news: Ms. Shinn is in negotiations to write a fifth installment in the series. All is right with the world.

Comments

  1. I got chills reading your summary...I didn't know it was out. I can't wait to read it!!!

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  2. oh...it makes me want to read it all over again. sigh.

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  3. You have to let me know when you get a hold of it, Liz. You'll love it.

    Liza, what do you think is an appropriate time to wait before rereading it?

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  4. Tayse is a roll model.

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  7. It will be in my hands by the end of the week. I was going to start the Bridei chronicles, but it might have to wait.

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  8. ahhhhhh....I loved it. My kids have been neglected, and my house is a mess, but all is right with the world....or at least Gilengaria.

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  9. Indeed. I'm so glad you liked it. Favorite part(s)? ;-)

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  10. Where to begin... The first time Amalie reads Cammon's thoughts. The night when everyone comes in Amalie's tent and realizes that Cammon and Amalie are "together." The first time Amalie sets the Raelynx on her would be suitor. When Amalie refuses to marry anyone but Cammon....sigh. I could go on and on. I thought she wrapped it up very nicely while still leaving a small window of opportunity for another book if need be. I got closure, but still want more.

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