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Heroes Adrift by Moira J. Moore

Well, the cover art has shifted finally. Though it's more of a lateral than an upward move. *sigh* Could they not have come up with something actually pertaining to the book? Say, perhaps, Lee bench dancing?? Now, that would be a good cover. In any event, cover art aside, I am three books into this great series now and feeling positively antsy for book four to come out.

In Heroes Adrift, Moira J. Moore takes Lee and Taro out of their respective comfort zones and into a culture and environment wholly unfamiliar to them. Just when Lee allows herself to hope things might be settling down in High Scape, the Empress calls she and Taro in for a little chat. She is sending them on a mission to the Southern Islands to find and bring home a long lost heir to the throne. The heir's existence has been kept a secret from everyone but the Empress. Now it is our favorite Pair's duty to find said mysterious personage and tote s/he home. Once in the Southern Islands, Lee and Taro are forced to reexamine their roles as friends and partners in a land where such roles are reversed and suddenly Lee's talents are highly valued and nobody seems to think much of Taro. Except, of course, Lee.

This is definitely a transition book in the middle of the series and I, for one, thoroughly enjoyed it. As I said before, events and character development in these books are not rushed. As a result, the reader is able to sit back and enjoy the ride. Secure in the feeling that the author has everything well in hand. Things will unfold as they will. And it will be good. That is not to say that things don't proceed apace. One event, in particular, that preyed on my mind for two and a half books is deliciously played out in this installment. Of course, it in turn spawns a host of other problems. But I have no doubt they will be dealt with in depth in the coming book(s). This series was such a wonderful find and I recommend it to anyone looking for fun, character-driven fantasy with a sense of humor.

Links
Chroniques d'Azhure Review
Speed-Reading Book Nerd Review

Comments

  1. You are right, the cover art on at least the first two looks pretty cheesy, but I think you've sold me. I'll put them on my to-read list.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You won't regret it, Liz. They're so not cheesy. :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. No, they're not!

    I think the cover art is really detrimental to this particular series. I mean, they're not gritty fantasy, but neither are they as silly as the covers make them seem.

    What did you think about the, eh, "resolution", Angie? Poor Lee is so sure she's just a passing thing for Taro. I think she's dense! But that's consistent with her character, actually.

    I can't wait for the next book.

    I also think the girl they rescued is going to play a huge role to come. Source AND shield in one?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yep, the covers are a big turn-off. And you're right. They do such a disservice to these great books! I wonder if the cover for the fourth book will match the third or be totally different again?

    I read and reread "that scene" several times now, to make sure it really did happen and I didn't just dream it after so long wishing it would.

    I'm torn over the "resolution." But I agree, it fits with Lee's personality. I didn't feel like the characters were untrue to themselves at all (as some people appear to think). Lee still has more to learn. I'm glad she let herself have a piece of happiness in this book and in the next book I want her to talk to Taro. Tell him what she wants and what she's afraid will happen. Then he can tell her she has nothing to be afraid of! :-) There are a lot of words that need to be said, explicitly. And I can't wait to hear them!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Anonymous2:14 PM

    The covers for the first two books were awful. This one is much better, but still rather misleading IMO - it's not a ship-based adventure by any means!

    I'm thinking she needs covers more similar in style to Lisa Shearin's covers...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Li! I agree. It's not a pirate book, for crying out loud.

    I haven't read any Lisa Shearin. Do you recommend her?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Anonymous1:45 PM

    Ermmm I asked for that, didn't I? :-) Recommend with reservations, I think. I didn't fall in love with "Magic Lost, Trouble Found", but I liked it enough to be getting the second book, which is out later this month. It's light fantasy, with a hint of romance as well.

    Here's her website - she has some excerpts up:
    http://www.lisashearin.com/books.cfm

    ReplyDelete
  8. Ok, thanks. Hm, I may take a look at the first one to see what I think.

    ReplyDelete

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