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Gabriel's Ghost by Linnea Sinclair

Thanks go to The Book Smugglers for tipping me off to this one. I've heard good things about Linnea Sinclair for awhile but was never sure where to jump in and was waiting for the right mood. I've definitely had a sci-fi hankering lately, so I figured now (on the heels of Grimspace and The Host) was as good a time as any. Gabriel's Ghost is certainly a fast-paced book and it was kind of cool that it started after some pretty significant action had already happened. The reader is caught up along the way as Captain Chasidah Bergren, aka Chaz, attempts to survive her life sentence on the desolate planet Moabar for a crime she didn't commit. Sound a bit like Jax's predicament in Grimspace? The two stories do have a fair bit in common, including a leading man who's "psychically gifted" to put it mildly. Though the writing style, IMO, is distinctly different.

I'm going to skip a detailed plot synopsis and just say it's light, entertaining space opera fare and I kept reading because of the characters. Chaz and Sully (aka Gabriel Ross Sullivan) are good ones. The dialogue is snappy and realistic and I liked that I never got frustrated with Chaz (who narrates the story). With Sully, yes, several times. Although, there always seemed to be a rather horrifically painful justifying reason for his actions and apparent complete failure to be forthcoming. But I was never frustrated with Chaz, never wanted to smack her upside the head for a particularly childish reaction or preoccupation with something irrelevant. And that was refreshing. I hate it when my heroines go against character and do something stupid merely for the sake of the plot. Chaz kept her head (if not her heart) and never ran off half-cocked, inadvertently plunging her companions into Utter Peril. I liked her and I liked Sully. I wanted to find out what happened to them and enjoyed the not-so-neatly wrapped up ending. I can say that with a smile on my face because the sequel comes out in July.

Links
In the Library Review
Jace Scribbles Review
Kathy's Review Corner Review
The Book Smugglers Review

Comments

  1. Glad you liked it. As soon as I finished it, I picked up another Sinclair book, The Down Home Zombie Blues and I can honestly say, I am a fan girl now LOL. The DHZB is much more sci-fi than romance and it is amazing!

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  2. Hi, Ana! I've already got Games of Command on my nightstand and am looking forward to starting it. Sounds like I should move on to DHZB after that. :)

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  3. Hmm I've been hearing good stuff about this. I might have to add it to my ridiculously-piled-up wishlist. :P

    Steph

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  4. I've read DHZB, but hadn't seen anything on this one. Now I'll have to pick up a copy. :)

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  5. Hey, Steph. I'd definitely say give GG a shot. It's a fun romp through space.

    Kimberly, I'm shocked, shocked to hear I read a book before you did. Usually I trail around in your footsteps, eating all the yummy crumbs. ;)

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  6. Hey Angie, I'm so glad that you enjoyed this one. It's a fun read--and I will second Ana's sentiment that The Down Home Zombie Blues is pretty damn good ;)

    I too loved how accessible Chaz was--not abrasive, not idiotic, just...Chaz. Wonderfully refreshing!

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  7. Yep, she always made the right decision and I loved that about her.

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  8. Angie...lol...there are so many I miss and I'm definitely the one trailing behind on this one. :)

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  9. I finally got around to this one, and I'm just about smacking myself upside the head for taking so darned long! And I'm with you, as much as I swooned for the flirtatious space-pirate, I was always firmly on Chaz' side. I loved how no non-sense she was, and how she "wore Army boots". Fantastic!

    I've linked to your review here.

    ReplyDelete

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