Skip to main content

Gone

After nine years, Readerville is shutting down for good. I've mentioned this place now and then as the venue that got me started discussing books online, but I'm not sure I've ever touched on just how much it meant to me and how sad I am it will be no more. Because it was a happy place. I "met" and made so many friends there. I was a regular member through the majority of my formal education, including the writing and defending of my thesis. I got pregnant and they threw me a virtual baby shower, sending me the most beloved books of their childhood. Logging on and checking out the threads marked the beginning of every day. Suffice it to say, it and its members had a huge influence on my life at a time when I needed that kind of community. I've moved on to blogging now and it is wonderful in its own way as well. But something inside seemed to go out when I read that announcement. So here are a couple of favorite posts from the 'Ville, in which people describe what Readerville meant to them.

You know, people see what they want to see. We're too clubby, too nice, too intellectual, too female, too liberal, too mainstream, too straight. It's just like life, folks. "We" are not any one thing. "We" are a bunch o' folk who like to read. Some of us are nice, some are prickly. Most are a combination of the two. Some read Proust. Some read Clancy. Some hold others "in the light." Some hold their noses. Some like God. Some like flowers. Most like good food. All like books. --NancyS

But on the flip-side, the internet can also bring people of different viewpoints together. People of all political and philosophical stripes can enjoy talking about good books, or even about how much they love their VW New Beetles or the details of planning their next trip to Disney World, etc. As we build and spend time in communities based on these particular interests, we have the opportunity to hear, from people we like and respect as friends, different viewpoints from our own in politics, religion and other "hot-button" issues. I think that can defuse the tendency we all have on occasion to think of those on the other side of the political spectrum as "them" vs. "us." It's hard to think of someone that way if they just sent you the new Mary Russell or a no-fail recipe for spice cake or step-by-step instructions for de-fragmenting your computer. And, to me, that is a good thing. --CKDexterHaven

I loved you, Readerville. R.I.P.

Comments

  1. What a lovely post and what a sad ending for Readerville.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Just curious, was Readerville behind the name of your blog? If so, what a nice tribute.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Janssen, thanks. Hard to see good things come to an end.

    Holly, it certainly was. I forgot to mention that. When I sat down to title the blog, I think I must have been trying to salvage something in the ether of the place.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

You Might Also Like

Angie's 2021 Must Be Mine

 It's like I don't want to curse anything by saying too much about my hopes for 2021. But I have zero problem talking about the upcoming books I'm excited to read. And so here are my most anticipated novels of 2021: And no covers yet on these, but I'm looking forward to them just the same: Neverland by Meagan Spooner Subtle Blood by K.J. Charles Devil in Disguise by Lisa Kleypas Which titles are on your list?

Review | To Sir Phillip, With Love by Julia Quinn

The first book to make it onto my best books I've read so far this year list was actually a surprise. Thanks to Bridgerton's massive success, Julia Quinn's name is everywhere these days. And I'm chuffed about the whole thing. That said, my Quinn reading up to this point has been sporadic at best. And I'd only read two novels in the actual Bridgerton series. So I decided to rectify that at the beginning of the year by starting with Eloise's story (the fifth in the series) because she is my uncontested favorite of the siblings. I had no idea what her story held, but I knew she would be a compelling lead. I also love the title and the role that letters play in the story.   Eloise Bridgerton is tired of everything. She is tired of the endless inane whirl of life among the ton. She is tired of being paraded around and forced to dance and converse with all the wrong men. But most of all she is tired of being suddenly and unexpectedly alone after her best friend Penelo

Angie's Best Books of 2020

 It is the last day of the year. Of this year specifically. "Well done," is all have to say if you're reading this. Well done, you. It's been quiet for awhile now around these parts. For obvious reasons. But I've been reading continuously and ever so gratefully. I have felt such a profound sense of gratitude this year for all of the creators in this world who have been tirelessly and so lovingly creating art for all of us. We have needed it so much. I have needed it so much. And this year of all years, the creation of art has felt like such a fierce act of love. So thank you. And so here I leave my best books of the year. My list stands at fourteen titles. And that feels just right. photo by @aamith (in the order in which I read them) A Heart So Fierce and Broken by Brigid Kemmerer If I Never Met You by Mhairi McFarlane Slippery Creatures by K.J. Charles Christmas at the Island Hotel by Jenny Colgan Boyfriend Material by Alexis Hall The Great Godden by Meg R