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Retro Friday Review: Arrows of the Queen by Mercedes Lackey

When I was a kid and my father was out of town for work, my mom and I got to have sleepovers in the big bed. We would curl up with our pillows stacked behind our backs and read books and eat ice cream and fall asleep whenever we wanted to. I loved it. And, unsurprisingly, the tradition continued on until I left home. One particular time I remember it was a Friday night and I was fourteen and my mom and I went to the base library to see what we could find. I wandered down the aisles and stopped when my eye caught on a pink and purple spine in the fantasy/scifi section. It seemed a bit...girly...for me and when I saw the pretty much opalescent horse on the cover I almost put it back on the shelf. But I liked the title. And the girl on the horse looked pale and sad and interesting with her short hair and her threadbare scarf. So I checked it out and that night curled up with my mom and a bowl of mint chocolate chip ice cream and fell in love.

Talia is an orphan. Raised in a very claustrophobic, incredibly closed off family hold that her uncle runs with an iron fist, she longs for a kinder, more stimulating world in which "family" refers to people who love you and not people who revile and shame you. When a white horse straight out of her dreams appears one day, Talia climbs into his saddle and never looks back. The horse is clearly no ordinary horse. He can sense emotions and share his own with Talia. He takes her to Haven, the capital city of Valdemar, where her hidden talents are recognized and she is enrolled in the Collegium--a school for heralds-in-training. The heralds are an elite force who are trained to protect the Queen and the realm from threat or harm. There at the Collegium Talia makes the first friends of her life (and a few enemies as well). When she stumbles across a plot to destroy the Queen, she is forced to harness her wayward abilities and use the connections she's made to convince the Queen and her council that there is a traitor in their midst.

This series is a very dear one to me. My fourteen-year-old self completely empathized with Talia and her insecurities and longings. She has to be one of the most passive heroines of any I've read, which makes her unique as I generally find myself drawn to stronger, more forceful personalities. But Talia matures, both chronologically and emotionally in this series, particularly in book two, Arrow's Flight, when she gets shoved through the refiner's fire as she completes her Heraldic training and emerges prepared to defend her Queen. And yet, she retains that innocence and inherent sweetness which somehow captured my heart more than a decade ago and has not let it go. Each book in this trilogy gets better and better and you only grow fonder of this family of characters Lackey has pieced together. Among Talia's inner circle, there is a not-so-ex-thief, a spoiled princess, a gruff and intimidating armsmaster, a crippled harpist, and Rolan--her horse and Companion. Mercedes Lackey's strength lies in these characters and how she is able to make you want so much for them. If you fall in love with the world you're also in luck as Ms. Lackey has written a whole host of books that take place in Valdemar, though this trilogy is by far the best, IMO, and definitely the place to start. Reading order: Arrows of the Queen, Arrow's Flight, and Arrow's Fall.

Comments

  1. I think I read one of the books that came after this - mmm, thinking here.. ok I had to google: it was BY THE SWORD, which worked as a standalone but was in the same world. I remember liking but not loving it but it did grow on me - ended up rereading it a few times. The girl as a warrior thing kinda cemented my love of kick-ass heroines!! :) I never picked up the rest of the series because I couldn't find it in Sri Lanka. Hmm. One of those "one days".

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  2. Ahh...the base library. If you don't mind me asking, what branch was your father in? My dad is a retired Marine.

    I have this book in storage right now and never got around to reading it...looks like I will now. :)

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  3. Janice, yeah, I remember reading BY THE SWORD awhile back. Honestly, none of her other books have grabbed me like these three did. I think it's the particular group of companions in this series that she hit the perfect combination with. Or something. Like I said, something about Talia really worked for me. Also I love, love, love the romance that develops in the next two books. ;)

    Samantha, *grin* the base library indeed. My dad is retired Air Force. The particular library I was referring to was at Lackland AFB in San Antonio, although base libraries around the world got me through time after time. :)

    I hope you do try this one. It's a quick, light, thoroughly enjoyable read.

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  4. I loved Mercedes Lackey's Valdemar books.

    Like you, ARROWS was the first one I read, but it's a tossup between these and the Vanyel trilogy for my favourite Lackeys (ahhh, the angst!).

    However, I haven't loved the more recent ones. I can't put my finger on it exactly, but they lack the magic of the earlier ones - too Mary Sue-ish, perhaps?

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  5. Li, I thought you were a fan! Ah, the Vanyel books...

    But I'm with you on the more recent ones. Blech. I really only re-read the ARROWS trilogy now. I love Dirk and Kris...

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  6. I love Mercedes Lackey! However somehow I missed out on this series. Hmm. There must have been a conspiracy involved...

    Thanks again for the review!

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  7. Michelle, you do? Sweet. Well, if you love Lackey then you MUST read this trilogy.

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