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In which I require a holiday read

I love the line in 84, Charing Cross Road where Helene writes to Frank telling him,
I require a book of love poems with spring coming on.
Do you ever feel that way? You can feel a particular season or time approaching and you start to itch for a certain read you always associate with that time or season. It happens to me regularly and last night I realized I require a holiday read with Christmas coming on. I evaluated my shelves and discovered that I don't have a specific book I read every Christmas season or even every winter. This is clearly Not Okay. And so I'm putting the question out there, asking for your recommendations. What are you favorite holiday reads? Because I'm craving a good one.

Comments

  1. Well, there's this old one "A Dog Named Christmas" I read in fourth grade...lol

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  2. Mr. Willowby's Christmas tree: http://www.amazon.com/Willowbys-Christmas-Tree-Robert-Barry/dp/0385327218

    It's one of the books I always associate with Christmas - even if it's not a big novel, I LOVE IT!

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  3. Anonymous1:37 PM

    I need some suggestions too! I totally know what you mean though. Sometimes I get cravings for books depending on the season/weather. I'm the same way with music.

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  4. It's not a holiday read as such, but if you haven't read The Secret of Dragonhome by John Peel, do. I think you'd really like it. I must reread my copy soon, it's been about a decade.

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  5. The Dark is Rising!

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  6. "Kringle" by Tony Abbott. Would make a great movie!

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0439749425/ref=s9_simp_gw_s0_p14_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=1NNDXRY1BZEMBSWWANAS&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=470938631&pf_rd_i=507846

    Laura Hartness
    http://CalicoCritic.blogspot.com

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  7. The Dark is rising, The Hogfather and I think I'll re-read Let it Snow by John Green, Maureen Johnson and Lauren Myacle this year. It was very christmassy and made me want t teacup pig :)

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  8. Kind of cheesy, but I always read Skipping Christmas by John Grisham this time of year.

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  9. I always read Rumer Godden's "The Story of Holly and Ivy". It's a dear book, about a little orphan girl and a doll that doesn't get sold for Christmas. That sounds a bit precious, but it's really a wonderful book. And if you can find a copy, Julie Lane's The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus. Wonderful stories and absolutely beautiful woodcuts.

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  10. The Best Christmas Pageant Ever?

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  11. I don't really like holiday reads, but I do always feel the need to listen to Christmas music in December.

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  12. These are such wonderful suggestions, you guys. Thank you! And they definitely do not have to be holiday-themed. Just ones you, for whatever reason, enjoy re-reading this time of year.

    THE DARK IS RISING is such a great suggestion! And it occurred to me the 2nd Julia Grey novel is a great Christmas read. I'm definitely looking up the picture books you've all suggested. They sound magical.

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  13. Maybe it's just cause the movie is such a tradition in my family, but a couple of years ago I finally picked up "A Christmas Story" in book form by Jean Shepherd. It's to die for. You can just hear his narration throughout and all the back story on the characters was wonderful. Lots of laughs and "illuminated sex in the window"

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  14. For some reason I gravitate toward the classics around the Holidays. I just finished Little Women and will be starting Jane Eyre.

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  15. s I always associate with Christmas - even if it's not a big novel, I LOVE IT!

    Work from home India

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