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Late Morning Stops

Just a few interesting places to stop on your rounds this Monday morning:


You've heard me go on enough about the wonder that is Megan Whalen Turner's Queen's Thief series. Well, now (for a limited time) you can read the first book--The Thief--for free online over at Harper Collins' site. Go see what I've been blathering on about. If you're looking for another push, go read Ana's review of the latest installment over at The Book Smugglers


Next, (because I can't help myself and I loved the book and they're making a a movie!) here is the official movie trailer for Beastly--the film adaptation of Alex Flinn's novel. 
 
Who can say for sure? But it's got NPH and this can only be a good thing. Really, if you haven't read the book and you enjoy B&B retellings, definitely give it a shot. 

And lastly, the story of a father-daughter reading streak that will leave you feeling all warm and fuzzy inside. Seriously, if you don't tear up just the teensiest bit there might be something, well, wrong with you. I'm just sayin'. (Thanks to Martha for the link!)

Comments

  1. Oooh, thanks for the notice on the Turner book. I was actually looking to buy the first book at the bookstore today at lunch, but they've never had it in stock. Grr. :)

    I bet I ought to just go ahead and order it, huh? (noooo, not looking for encouragement at all, nope)

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  2. I loved "Beastly" as well. But, for some reason the trailer looks really cheesy to me. I hope the movie is good...

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  3. Here's my two cents:

    One cent: I'll be borrowing Beastly from my library asap.

    Two cent: What an amazing feat that father and daughter accomplished. It seems near impossible with a teenager. Trust me. LOL.

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  4. Anonymous12:08 PM

    I've been trying to decide whether I read Beastly for ages. So you recommend it? Did you review it?

    Thanks for the heads up about The Thief. I'll pass this on to some people.

    I think I'm going to dig into A Conspiracy of Kings tonight.

    KarenS

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  5. That's sweet (The Streak). I'm thinking.. and I don't recall either parent reading to me. They probably did though when I was pretty young. I remember reading to my brother and sister. Reading out loud is the only time I feel comfortable to be over-the-top dramatic.

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  6. I want to read Beastly :)

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  7. I'm still a little teary eyed after reading about The Streak. What a wonderful relationship builder.

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  8. KMont, lol. My guess is that after you finish QUEEN you will want to own this series. But that could be my inner fangirl talking.

    Emily, I really hope so, too. She is definitely not AT ALL how I pictured Linda. But hopefully they'll pull it off.

    Christine, yay! It's a very sweet (at times hilarious) story. And I believe you. I was in awe of the work it must have taken to keep that streak going.

    Karen, I definitely recommend it. I think I did a short paragraph review of it ages back before I was really in my groove blog-wise. But here it is, fwiw.

    Happy reading tonight! :)

    Janice, same here re: letting myself get dramatic while reading aloud. It's especially fun with Will as he eats the voices up. And is a much better mimic than me, so I hear him "doing" the voices the next day much better than I ever could.

    bookaholic, yes, yes you do. *hypnotic voice*

    Michelle, seriously. I was suitably awed and impressed.

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  9. Thanks for the link to The Streak. So lovely. My dad also read all the Wizard of Oz books to me and my brother so it kind of hit home. I still love to be read to. My husband and I read all the Series of Unfortunate Events book aloud to one another, and when I was in college my roommates and read several books aloud to one another. Yes, we were nerdy, and yes, I had great roommates.

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  10. MWT is awesome! ♥♥♥

    My friend just gave me Beastly and I look forward to reading that because I'm a fan of B&B retellings. Thanks for posting about The Streak, that's a lovely story! I know my parents read to me when I was younger but I started reading on my own in third grade.

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  11. Anonymous5:57 AM

    Thanks, Angie. Great review. I'll have to pick this one up before the movie tie-in cover shows up! KarenS

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  12. That was a really touching article. I read to my little sister (not with this kind of regularity, of course) from when I was nine and she was six to when I moved out of the house to go to college.

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  13. JoLee, how wonderful. That article made me excited to read the Oz books with Will. And I read aloud with some of my roommates as well. *nerd solidarity*

    Chachic, yeah, it's amazing how they kept it going as she grew up.

    Karen, lol, good call. Particularly as I like the whole white rose thing. Who knows what they'll slap on it for the movie?

    Jenny, that is so great! I love hearing stuff like that. And I wish I'd had an older sister like you. :)

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