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Tell Me What to Read: Round 3

All right! Time for Round 3 of Tell Me What to Read. I got to Northlander faster this time around and so I'm allowing myself to have high hopes for June.  So bring on the suggestions! Tell me what book I should read this month. It can be any genre, any age level, and have been published last week or three hundred years ago. You can pick it because it's a book that everyone should read or because it changed your life or because it is great literature or just because it entertained you. I'm excited to see what you follow up the most excellent Northlander with. 


As my friend and inspiration
Janssen says--here's how it goes:
  1. Comment with the title and author of one book you think I should read (any book you want). One title only, please, lest my brain explode.
  2. I'll select one comment at random.
  3. On the off-chance that I've already read the book you select, I'll contact you and ask for a follow-up suggestion (make sure there is a way to contact you either by blog or email).
  4. I'll get a copy of the book and read it by the end of the month (or so....).
  5. I'll write a review of it here. Even if I hate the book, I will not hate you.
And. . .go!

Comments

  1. I'm suggesting the same book from last time: A Voice In The Wind by Francine Rivers. I really loved that book and I want everyone to read it! :)

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  2. Galax-Arena by Gillian Rubinstein. It's fantastic and unfortunately not many people know about it.

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  3. Myrrhine11:10 AM

    The Amulet of Samarkand by Jonathan Stroud.

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  4. My suggestion is Mistborn by Brandon Sanderson. OMG so so so so good, especially if you enjoy fantasy.

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  5. I can't remember what I put last time but The Pursuit of Love by Nancy Mitford is one of my favourite books.

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  6. I suggest Diamond Ruby by Joe Wallace. I haven't had the pleasure of reading it but I did have the pleasure of meeting the author and he is fabulous.

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  7. A Girl Named Disaster by Nancy Farmer.

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  8. Erm The Sky is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson

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  9. Still hoping to convince someone to read Precious Bane by Mary Webb...

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  10. Anonymous2:43 PM

    I have to recommend Audrey Wait by Robin Benway again. Delightful!

    KarenS

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  11. The Body Finder (Body Finder, #1) by Kimberly Derting

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  12. Ellyll3:32 PM

    Trick of the Light, by Rob Thurman.

    Why? So many reasons. The characters: Trixa (main character), clever, somewhat snarky, and self-sufficient, but very protective of the helpless. She's surrounded herself with a motley crew: her friend Leo, with whom she shares a bar and secrets and her surrogate children, Zeke and Griffin, who work as demon fighters for a shadowy organization run by angels. Trixa is on a mission to find her brother's killer, and she uses all her wiles to do it. But she still cares, so very much, about the broken and damaged people, and the innocents around her. Trixa is a rarity in urban fantasy: a heroine who uses her brains much more than a gun or sword (although she can fight when she has to).

    The plot is twisty and VERY smart, and the ending is a perfect surprise.

    And Rob Thurman, while not especially well known, is a brilliant writer. Her characters come from tough backgrounds, but they form families of their own, and they care so fiercely.

    Okay, gone on for a while. Anyhow, that's my suggestion, and why. I will slink off now. ;)

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  13. I'm going to suggest Life as We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer again. I know you'd love it!

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  14. Nothing But Blue Skies, by Tom Holt.

    Summary: "There are many reasons why British summers are either non-existent or, alternatively, held on a Thursday. Many of these reasons are either scientific, mad, or both—but all of them are wrong, especially the scientific ones. The real reason why it rains perpetually from January 1st to December 31st is, of course, irritable Chinese Water Dragons. Karen is one such legendary creature. Ancient, noble, nearly indestructible and, for a number of wildly improbable reasons, working as a real estate agent, Karen is irritable quite a lot of the time. But now things have changed, and Karen’s no longer irritable. She’s furious."

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  15. A Spy in the House, by Y. S. Lee
    Not anything hardcore, but an enjoyable read with a fabulous heroine and a romance that promises more in the upcoming sequel.

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  16. I second the recommendation for The Amulet of Samarkand! The Bartimaeus trilogy is hilarious. Since that has already been mentioned, I'm recommending Saving Francesca by Melina Marchetta. I know you loved Jellicoe Road so I think you should read more from the same author. :) It's different, not as intense as Jellicoe Road but still really enjoyable.

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  17. This time around I'll go with Once a Princess, by Sherwood Smith!

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  18. The Amulet of Samarkand by Jonathan Stroud

    I love this book because it has an awesome narrator who is the epitome of lovable snarkiness and well...the entire story is brilliant as well :D

    OH WAIT it's already been suggested! (Cool :D) Well I shall just second the suggestion (or third it hehe)!

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  19. Lyssa K4:08 AM

    What about Everlost by Neal Shusterman?

    I can't recommend it (and its sequel, Everwild) enough because they are mind-blogging goodness with an insanely fascinating "alternate world", intricate characters, brilliant twists, convoluted villains, and the best story ever.

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  20. Anonymous6:37 AM

    A Rather Lovely Inheritance by C.A. Belmond

    I might have recommended it last time, I can't remember. But I'm choosing it again anyway because I would love to see this book (and the sequels) get some attention!

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  21. Alright Miss Angie...I'm going to suggest...'Sir Apropos of Nothing' by Peter David. :)

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  22. Incarceron by Catherine Fisher. I don't think I've noticed that you read this one yet?

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  23. I'm sticking with The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde. Some tantalizing details: time travel, pet dodos, Mr. Rochester from Jane Eyre, a main character by the name of Thursday Next.

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  24. Anonymous8:04 PM

    The Solace of Leaving Early by Haven Kimmel.

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  25. Harmonic Feedback by Tara Kelly. Best YA book I've read so far this year.

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  26. I couldn't come up with a suggestion, and then suddenly it hit me:

    Lois McMaster Bujold's "The Warrior's Apprentice"

    ReplyDelete

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