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Wednesday Stops

And in links of awesome today . . .

Sarah Rees Brennan is handing out summer book recommendations and I am paying attention. "They made each other laugh through being funny and terrible." Uh . . . yes, please. "People who are staggering around being staggeringly crazy in love?" Hm . . . don't mind if I do.

Ever since the Mythopoeic Society honored Sunshine a few years back, I've known they had excellent taste. They proved it again this week by handing out their annual award for Children's Literature to . . . the Queen's Thief series! Well done, Mythopoeic Society. Well. Freaking. Done.

Lastly, the Bookaholics Romance Book Club has a great interview up with Moira Moore, plus a giveaway. The release of Heroes at Odds is literally just around the corner now (praise be), and Moira discusses all kinds of good stuff related to Taro, Lee, and the series.

Enjoy!

Comments

  1. Here's a rec: Daughter of Smoke & Bone, by Laini Taylor. Kind of like a grown up His Dark Materials.

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  2. Okay. You are literally the third person to recommend that book to me in a 24 hour period. Must acquire.

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  3. I LOVED that interview with Moira J. Moore. So good! But only one more book? *sobs*

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  4. This is a completely random and possibly impertinent question, but I will ask it anyway. Have you ever read Ella Enchanted? With the exception of Diana Wynne Jones, I find that we share almost the exact same favorite authors and books (this is actually how I found your blog. Every time I typed in a book I liked, Angieville popped up), and as Ella Enchanted has been a favorite ever since I was young, I wondered if you've ever read it. It's a fairy tale retelling, so I thought it'd be right up your ally. However, I don't remember ever reading even the slightest mention of Ella in any of your blog posts. It's something I've thought about for awhile now...Er...perhaps to make this seem less rude, I'll just add that I love your blog. You're a great writer. You add a lot of depth and feeling to your reviews, and even in your simplest blog posts it's very clear how much you love books and reading. :)

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  5. Michelle, wasn't it great?! And I know. I was surprised that the end of the series is imminent as well. And now I'm very curious to see how she'll wrap it all up.

    Lizzy, what a kind comment to leave. You really made my day! And the answer to your question is very simple--no. I've never read it. I know! The horror... I think I've stayed away because it's so clearly beloved and I was afraid I wouldn't love it, too. But your wholehearted recommendation is making me think I need to give it a shot right away. I even own a copy! lol.

    Out of curiosity, what did you think of the movie adaptation? I think I saw the first few minutes of it and wasn't thrilled.

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  6. Ooh Angie I've heard horrible things about the movie don't watch it. :D Just read.

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