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"I'll always long for your asking me."

It's a new year, a clean slate. And I like to think of it as such, quietly absorbing the possibilities as I quietly restrain myself from attempting to make overly ambitious resolutions that I will only renege on or fail at miserably within a month's time. As I cast about for some possibility, some inspiration, I came across an unlikely source: literary break-up letters. This fascinating article in The Atlantic features excerpts and background information from eight different writers penning their parting words to lovers, spouses, more-than-friends. Luminaries include Simone de Beauvoir (whose line I used in my post title), Virginia Woolf, Edith Wharton, Oscar Wilde, Mary Wollstonecraft, and more. They are wistful and so very real. Just the kind of real I needed at this time of cold, quiet beginnings. I hope your year is full of possibilities. And if there must be partings, let them be well-written.

Comments

  1. I know what you mean. It's so easy to be overly ambitious when we are so optimistic about the upcoming year and our abilities. I'm still assessing what I want to accomplish reading-wise this year. I think just more older books and adult books. I've been feeling a little burnt out on YA stuff. Oh, and I want to read the Sevenwaters books.

    Good luck to you, whatever you decide on, Angie. I know you'll rock it.

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    Replies
    1. You know I never make reading goals? Outside of a few classics I want to get to each year, that is. But I watch everyone participating in a host of reading challenges and am all amazement and admiration. These days I go where the wind takes me. I understand about the burnout though. I think I've been feeling a bit of it as well.

      But you WILL NOT REGRET reading the Sevenwaters books. That I can promise you, Flann. And I really want to be around while the whole thing is going down!!

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  2. Oh my. Now people break up with text messages. :) It seems like letters are a lost art form. Does anybody write them anymore? I like to send thank you notes in the the mail, but that's about it. Of course, maybe it's just that I lack someone to write to? :)

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    Replies
    1. Ha! How things have changed. I think you're right though. We're not separated the way people used to be. Those letters written and sent across physical and emotional distances were truly lifelines, I think. I certainly enjoyed reading these.

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  3. Thanks for this Angie. It was exactly what I needed.

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  4. I love old letters, and old love letters are awesome! Thanks for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. So do I, Jen. These were especially so.

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  5. Anonymous3:39 PM

    Talk about well written. *shudders with chills* You've inspired me.

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    Replies
    1. Aren't they? Inspired was exactly how I felt after reading them.

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    2. Anonymous12:21 PM

      Yes they were. But I meant your words.

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    3. Well, shucks. ;)

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