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Book Giveaway: Wide Open, Deep Down, & Strange Country by Deborah Coates


To celebrate the release of Strange Country—the third book in Deborah Coates' rural fantasy/paranormal mystery trilogy (how's that for a mashup of awesome?)—Tor Books has been gracious enough to offer up a set containing the complete trilogy. I have yet to read this series, but two things immediately caught my eye. The first is the enticing Sharon Shinn quote on the cover:
Twin Peaks meets Dean Koontz in this tale of a windswept northern prairie town beset by eerie events. Deborah Coates offers a pitch-perfect sense of place, an uncanny knack for dialogue, and a complex heroine who's mad, sad, tenacious, and tough.
Yes, please. The second is the term "rural fantasy." In my mind, I place it somewhere in the vicinity of Ilona Andrews' Edge series, which they termed "rustic fantasy." Either way, I can't wait to start this series and see.


This giveaway is open to those with U.S. or Canada mailing addresses. To enter, fill out the Rafflecopter. The giveaway will be open through Tuesday, June 10th.

Comments

  1. these covers are gorgeous. I haven't heard of these yet, but I'm thinking I'll put them on my massive TBR pile. :)

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  2. I'd love a chance to read this series :) I'd recommend Ilona Andrew's The Edge series :) Thanks for sharing!

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  3. I haven't started this series either, but those two things you pointed out are honestly just as enticing to me! I consider myself to be a pretty big fantasy fan, yet I've never heard of rural fantasy. Craziness! It sounds like maybe it's like urban fantasy but in the country? I have no recommendations now, but I will definitely be looking more into this subgenre!
    And thank you for the giveaway!

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  4. This is the first time I've heard of rural fantasy. I didn't know it was a sub-genre.

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  5. I loved the first book in this series. Check out John the Balladeer by Manly Wade Wellman or The Hum and the shiver by Alex Bledsoe for other rural fantasy. Both of these are set in the Appalachian mountains vs. the plains of the Midwest.

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  6. I read and liked the first book, and already own the second! I'm into it.

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  7. I have never heard of rural fantasy before (although I am quite familiar with urban fantasy...) so I'm not even sure which books that I have read would be classified in that category. Perhaps The Scorpio Races by Maggie Stiefvater? If so, I enjoyed that one quite a lot :)

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  8. I loved the first 2 books in the series. I'm pretty jazzed that we get Boyd's POV in 'Strange Country.' As for a rec - this series really has been my gateway into the genre. I've never been a fan of urban (or the rural subgenre) fantasy, although Anne Bishop's 'The Others' series comes to mind.

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