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Halloween Giveaway: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

I can make kind of a lovely story about why there's been so much radio silence around these parts lately. But the truth of the matter is my blogging time as been sucked away by the San Francisco Giants, who were not supposed to get into the playoffs but who did and so I am a very happy (but very nonblogging) girl. To make up for this, I'm happy to host a giveaway today, and a Halloween one at that! 


Thanks to Penguin Books, we're giving away one copy of the new Penguin Classics edition of Washington Irving's classic The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Other Stories. This new collection of larger-than-life tales contains Washington Irving’s best-known literary inventions—Ichabod Crane, the Headless Horseman, and Rip Van Winkle—and features a new introduction and notes by Elizabeth L. Bradley, author of Knickerbocker: The Myth Behind New York and literary consultant to Historic Hudson Valley, the caretakers of Irving’s Tarrytown, New York home. And here's the animated book trailer:


This giveaway is open to those with U.S. or Canada mailing addresses. To enter, fill out the Rafflecopter. The giveaway will be open through Thursday, October 16th.

Comments

  1. How literary are we talking, here? ;-) I think my very favorite ghost story in books is probably The Children of Green Knowe by L. M. Burton (and its sequel, The Treasure of Green Knowe.) Lovely, magical MG books.

    This is a great giveaway! It's been years since I read these three stories; I really should read them again.

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  2. I clearly have not read enough ghost stories because the only one I can think of off the top of my head is "Anna Dressed in Blood" and while it was ok, I did not love it. I haven't read any of these classic ghost stories, but would love to give them a go!

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  3. For brilliance, I love The Turn of the Screw by Henry James. But for nostalgia, it has to be Wait Till Helen Comes by Mary Downing Hahn.

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  4. I haven't read very many literary ghost stories, unfortunately. I did, however, enjoy The Turn of the Screw once I was able to get momentum in reading it. =)

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