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Friends, Romans, Countrymen, Lend me Your Recs

Guys. We are going on a trip―a trip we have been planning for years. And it is finally happening next week! We're going to visit my parents in France, and we are taking the whole gang. Or rather, all three kids but not the dog. Who I am desperately sad about leaving and really hope he doesn't think we've up and given him to another family and proceed to forget all about us. It's just two weeks. But we've never left him that long before, and I am obviously emotional about it. Have I posted pics of Sodapop here before? I'm not sure that I ever have. Here he is on the day we got him:
And here he is now in his natural habitat, which is to say in my library on laundry day:
Ahem. 

The actual point of this post is to get your reading recs for the trip! I'm completely torn over which physical books to take with me. Yes, I realize most of my reading will be done on my Kindle by necessity, but I always have to have some physical copies with me. For both safety and Instagram purposes. You understand. But this is also where you come in. I have a pretty good queue going in the way of digital ARCs. Here's a sample:
But what other eBooks do I need to acquire? And which physical copies would you take with you if you were going to be wandering the streets of Paris in a week's time? What's the best of the best that you've read recently? And if you've been before, are there any bookish/foodie spots we definitely need to hit? I am all ears.

Comments

  1. I am sure this is on your list, but Shakespeare and Company! I always try to pick up something Paris/France-themed while there.

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    Replies
    1. Yes!! I have never been there and I'm so excited to get to stop in this time.

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  2. Ah, how exciting!!! Sodapop is adorable, I can see why you're going to miss him!

    Also jealous of the Aurora Rising ARC - I'm waiting for it to come through from my library soon, fingers crossed.

    Umm - books that have made my trans-Atlantic flights whizz past (if not necessarily French-y books)
    - MCA Hogarth's Her Instruments - space opera (the e-boxset is three books + a novella)
    - Jodi Taylor's time travel series - so much fun, and if you like her voice, there's about 10 books or so in the series, so perfect summer reading
    - Rachel Neumeier's Black Dog series - rural UF, if that's a thing

    As for Paris, neither book/food-ish (I know, sorry!) but if you want to pick up French skincare items for less, look up CityPharma - they always have great offers/sales on. It gets really crowded in the afternoon, but is usually quiet in the mornings.

    Have a wonderful holiday!

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  3. Ok! I am back with some book related thoughts for your trip (and please tell us all about it!)

    I cannot necessarily help with the foodie side, but these few might:
    - Mastering the Art of French Eating - An Mah (a memoir by a diplomat's wife who ended up having to explore a lot alone when her husband got reposted about pretty much what it says on the tin, broken down by region & I KNOW she includes a few of her favorite bistros - side note her newsletter is lovely for that too)

    - Paris, My Sweet by Amy Thomas. Probably a bit dated now but still worth a look. Broken down by sweet/pastry type, she tells stories about her quest and lists her favorite places in NY and Paris to get croissants, macarons, etc.

    - The Sweet Life in Paris - David Lebovitz. Part memoir, some recipes and some recommendations. I paired this one and Paris My Sweet to decide where to go for breakfast!

    For beautiful physical copies, you might consider Paris Letters by Janice Macleod. Musings and watercolors from her time in Paris and the sweet story of how she ended up meeting her husband.

    Otherwise, I haven't read them, but Laura Florand writes light contemporary romance set in Paris /France that you may enjoy!
    -

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  4. I really love Joanna Bourne's historical romances set against the backdrop of the Napoleonic wars. The Black Hawk is my favorite (not sure if I read about them here first?). The House of Shattered Wings by Aliette de Brodard is also really good.

    Food wise: David Leibowitz (who has been mentioned above) has a great, really helpful website. In the Marais, Au Passage is an excellent restaurant (sister restaurant to Chateaubriand). Al Ajami is a Lebanese place that's really good (and open on Sundays when alot of other restaurants are closed. Shu is a Japanese kushiyaki place that might be better than places in Tokyo.

    And when you get to Paris, you can stop off at Bon Marche and pick up yummy cheeses and snacks to eat throughout your stay.

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  5. Have a great time! For physical books, I would go with some of the classics that are set in France -- my first choices would be The Scarlet Pimpernel and The Phantom of the Opera, because neither is overly long, but I would also consider books by Hugo or Dumas. (Some of those recs I have read, and some I haven't. Of the ones I've read, The Scarlet Pimpernel was my favorite.)

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  6. Aw, what a cute little pup! I’m reading The Bride Test now and enjoying it. The last book that I really got into on a flight was by Penny Reid. Mozart something. It was really light and fun and perfect for travel

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