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Pride by Rachel Vincent

So it really seems like I just read Stray. I can't believe it's been almost a year since Rogue came out and that this is the third Werecat book. But, having finished PrideI can honestly say that this series has gotten better with each book and this is my favorite one so far. The good news is that the wait for the fourth book,Prey, will be much less than a year. It's due out July 1st and I will definitely be picking it up. Rachel Vincent has a tendency to end each volume not necessarily on a cliffhanger, but certainly at a point at which you are definitely opposed to stopping! Pride was officially released on February 1st and until the 4th Rachel is hosting a Pride release contest. Here is the blurb:
Here's hoping cats do have nine lives.
I’m on trial for my life. Accused of infecting my human ex-boyfriend—and killing him to cover up the crime. I’m not guilty. But tell that to the panel of Alphas sitting in judgment. Infecting a human is one of three capital offenses recognized by the Pride—along with murder and disclosure of our existence to a human.I’m two for three. A goner.
On top of that, Marc is in danger of being tossed from the Pride, then we discovered a rogue stray terrorizing the mountainside, hunting a wild teenage tabbycat. I think I can protect her from both the ambitious rogue and the scheming of the territorial council. 
If I survive my own trial…
This third story focuses almost solely on Faythe's murder trial and I liked the less extended plotline as it gave me a chance to visit these characters during some rather unusual downtime, though it was no less tense to be sure! The Alpha tribunal she faces consists of her sympathetic Uncle Rick, the obnoxious and conniving Calvin Malone, and the decrepit not-long-for-this-world Paul Blackwell. Malone appears intent on pushing for the death penalty if he can get Blackwell to back him. And in this courtroom Faythe is guilty until proven innocent. 
I sank back into the world in this volume much faster than last time. It was good to be back with Faythe, Marc, Jace, and the gang. I immediately cared about what was going on and how/if Faythe was going to get out of this one with her claws intact. Perhaps most rewardingly, I felt like I was able to actually watch her mature somewhat during the course of the story. She's still Faythe, of course. Her credo is always gonna be it's better to ask for forgiveness than permission. But, that said, she is beginning to take into account the larger picture, the intricate snarl of pride politics, and the subtler ways in which she is able to maneuver within her world without causing dire ramifications for those she loves. I maintain, it's hard to be Faythe, and I admire her strength of will. I'm not sure I would be able to make some of the choices she's made. She's never gonna pull her punches, but she's learning to pick her battles and I have high hopes for the continuation of her fight in the next installment.  

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Photo by @aamith (in the order in which I read them)

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