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Spontaneous Rereading, or Easing the Cracks in Your Heart

So the other night I found myself compelled to pick up my copy of Fangirl. It only recently made its way back to my shelves after a few rounds with a few of the usual suspects. Rather lazily, I opened it to whatever page my fingers found and reread that page. And then I did it again. Browsing led to bingeing. But before I lost track of time completely, I had the good sense to see the writing on the wall. And so instead of just reading from the 3/4 mark (where I was at the time) through to the end, I flipped happily back to page one and settled in for a blissful reacquaintance with the characters and words I fell so in love with the first time.

You guys, it was so good. And because I couldn't quite contain the pleasure within my own skin, I started tapping out my favorite quotes and texting them to . . . people who would understand.
I may have gotten a touch carried away, but at one point my friend Beth made the observation that it's the rereads that ease all the cracks in your heart. I don't think I ever thought of it exactly that way, but I know that I am a consummate rereader. That I would not be okay if I couldn't reread as needed. And it feels right that part of my drive to return to worlds, characters, perfect turns of phrase is knowing they will ease the cracks that have found their way in in the time since last I saw them. I know Cath would agree. Does it feel that way to you?

Comments

  1. Yes! That exactly. What a fabulous phrase, I'm stealing it. I just know I am going to LOVE Fangirl.
    There are certain books that are just so dear to me I can't imagine not visiting the characters and world again and again. . People who don't re-read kind of baffle me :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She really hit the nail on the head with that phrase, didn't she?

      I really can't wait for you to read it!!

      It's like non-rereaders speak a different language.

      Delete
  2. Anonymous2:54 PM

    I love to re-read as well. Like you said, I love to revisit those characters that meant to much to me, and rereading is liking seeing your best friend again. I do tend to re-read books that might not be my all-time favorites, though. I mean they will be ones that I really liked, but aren't one's that necessarily broke my heart. It's sort of comfort reading.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It really is like a dear friendship. That's an interesting point you make. It's true, there are beloved books of mine that I can only read once every . . . decade . . . or so. Lol. Comfort is the word.

      Delete
  3. I'm also reading Fangirl, because soooo many told me I would love it. It's comfort food!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lol. I know. It's been widely praised. But justly, I think. ;)

      Delete
  4. Anonymous7:40 AM

    I am reading this right now and you just made me so excited!!! AHHH THE QUOTE ABOUT WHEN A GUY LOOKS AT YOU DIFFERENTLY!! I am dead. So glad to hear that this one is worth a re-read :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're reading it right now?! Ahhhh. I'm so happy for you. Lol.

      That quote is just IT.

      Delete

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