Skip to main content

Fragile Eternity by Melissa Marr

For those unfamiliar with or new to the series, Fragile Eternity is the third book in Melissa Marr's Wicked Lovely world and the long-awaited direct sequel to Wicked Lovely itself. The painful and beautiful Ink Exchange was more of a companion novel toWicked Lovely and followed Aislinn's friend Leslie. Fragile Eternity picks up shortly after the end of Ink Exchange and divides its time between the four original principals--Aislinn, Seth, Keenan, and Donia. All of them are struggling to deal with the consequences of their actions (or, in a few key cases, inactions), which resulted in Leslie walking away from it all and Irial abdicating his throne, effectively forcing Niall to fill his deep, dark shoes.

How they live now includes:

1. Aislinn working really hard not to touch Keenan with a ten-foot pole. Bad things happen in the castle when she does. Mostly for Seth.
2. Keenan working even harder to do a lot more than touch Aislinn. All in the name of his court, of course, but still. You are starting to really piss me off, Summer King.
3. Seth alternating between the Pit of Despair and fighting the good fight to save his lady from a fate worse than death, a.k.a., Keenan. He's worked so hard to be good, but he's still so freaking mortal.
4. Donia growing more and more like Beira with every falling snowflake. It's hard to blame her. After all, she's in love with an insufferably arrogant faery who seems bent on destroying her court and trampling her heart. Not necessarily in that order. You'd be cold, too.

The interesting thing about Fragile Eternity is that the most compelling characters are not those four. Everyone's fate seems to hang on them, yes, but it's the peripheral characters who steal the show. First of all, Niall. I have no words for how awesome the Dark Lord is. With the flapping coat and the brotherhood with Seth and the freedom he inhabits as the leader of the dark fey. Is it me or does it take embracing evil to see clearly in this world? Irial felt the same way to me and, though I have loved Niall in all his forms and allegiances, I think this incarnation may be my favorite. Second, Sorcha. The queen of the High Court and the most remote of faeries, I thought I would find her tedious and cruel. Instead, she stepped right off the page and the scenes with her and Seth tugged at my heart and made me look forward to more from her in the fourth (or fifth) book. I'm actually a little worried for her, which just goes to show how Marr was able to lend a certain humanity to a faery who goes out of her way to avoid conversing with humans. And third, Sorcha's younger brother Devlin. Devlin is Sorcha's enforcer and all around scary guard. He has a weird and potentially extremely problematic bond with both his sisters, Order and Chaos, and I feel absolutely certain he will play a larger and more important role in books to come. So while all four of the main characters annoyed me at times (I now officially repudiate Keenan), these three peripherals delighted me to no end and from the moment Seth meets Sorcha I hit the point of no return and had to read it straight through to the finish. The awful, exciting, invigorating finish. Can't wait for the next one, Ms. Marr.

Comments

  1. Oh, yes I agree with you 100% on Nial and Sorcha. How I love them. Ash annoyed me but I LOVED Seth, loved reading POV finally and what he's done.

    as for Keenan - I hate the guy. Although that last scene between him and Donia? amazing.

    Gosh, Melissa Marr is such an amazing writing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Angie. I just found your blog today - and as you can see, my name is Angie too, and so naturally I'm totally loving the name of your blog (and wishing I'd thought of it first :).

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ana, that's the thing. Aislinn was so wishy washy in this one. She didn't deserve everything Seth went though! Sigh. And don't get me started on Keenan not deserving Donia. If it weren't for how much Seth loves her, I'd say Ash and Keenan deserve each other at this point. Grr...

    Angie, wow, it's so rare to meet another Angie! I'm delighted to make your acquaintance. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Aislinn is annoying, but I do love Seth. I hate Keenan and sort of think he and Aislinn deserve each other.

    I also love Niall and loved Irial (can he please come back) I also like Sorcha and Donia.

    I just hate the summer court, I guess.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Amy, yep, yep, yep. Irial is welcome back any time.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I just found your blog today, and am enjoying it.

    I keep hearing about the Wicked Lovely series, and need to bump it up on my To Be Read list... Thanks for the review of this book.

    ReplyDelete
  7. imbookingit, welcome! Hope you enjoy WICKED LOVELY. She does something interesting and unexpected with each volume. Don't be a stranger. :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. It's funny. We all seem to have different favourites. I still really like Irial, he stays my favourite character. I wasn't much interested about Niall, I found Aislinn too melodramatic (why does she seems to think her friends will suddenly stop dead now she is immortal ?), I was ok with the Winter queen, I grow fonder with Keenan mostly because nearly everyone seem against him when he didn't do anything wrong while I didn't know what to think of him before and I hate Seth, this guy is too good, too perfect so he annoys me, nice and friendly, even that one fairy king and two fairy queens really like him... ok maybe not perfect, he dared to say Keenan was at fault for Seth and Aislinn's separation when the human was the one to choose it. A so responsible guy !

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Angie's Best Books of 2016

Let's just lay our cards on the table, shall we, and agree that, on the whole, 2016 was an abysmal year.
And I'd just like to personally invite it not to let the door hit it on the way out.
This is me being as charitable as I can possibly be at this point. 
That said, I want to send a glorious shout out to the wonderful books that have come out this past year, and to all the authors (and readers) who have not given in to the anxiety, depression, anger, and fear that I know so many of us have felt throughout the past twelve months (or more). It is the last day of the year, and I have poured all of my gratitude (and hope for a better one to come) into my annual list of my favorite reads of the year. Just 17 this year. Fewer than the past few years, which indicates a healthy dose of necessary rereading in this year that has been what it was, as well as the fact that I just didn't get to as many new releases.


(in the order in which I read them)
The Thirteenth Earlby Evelyn Pry…

My Year of Georgette Heyer | Book the First: The Convenient Marriage

This is not a drill. I repeat, THIS IS NOT A DRILL. I believe I am, in fact, upon the brink of accomplishing something that I have been meaning to do for years. I want you all to be the first to know that I just read my first very Georgette Heyer. That's right. I actually did it. After years of promising myself and countless others (many of you) that I would do it, I finally managed it! And I can tell that I'm about to dive headlong into a full-fledged binge.

After consulting all of your past comments on which Heyers are your favorites and why (and after some serious counsel from Beth and a well-timed trip to our local Barnes & Noble), I chose to start with The Convenient Marriage. I had no idea it would turn out to contain, without question, one of my favorite proposal scenes ever. The kind of proposal scene that makes you feel like nothing could ever go wrong after it. It takes place very early on, and it made me laugh and sigh repeatedly with delight. I know I will be …

Review | Hunted by Meagan Spooner

I'm just going to start off by saying I cannot stop thinking about this book. I finished it weeks ago, but this lovely Beauty and the Beast adaptation will not leave my mind. This is the first book I've really read by Meagan Spooner. I gave These Broken Stars a bit of a go awhile back, but we sort of drifted apart halfway through. Not the case here. The gorgeous cover caught my eye and the early glowing reviews reinforced my conviction. Having finished it, I immediately ran out and purchased copies for a number of the relevant readers in my life. And despite having pushed on and read several books since, Huntedis the one I find my mind and heart returning to over and over again.

Yeva holds a lot of things in. She loves her family—her father, her sisters—and so she sits obediently in the baronessa's chambers. She pretends to make small talk and embroider bits of cloth with the other ladies. She smiles politely at the young man who is said to be courting her (and doesn'…