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Vintage Pretties

When it comes to gorgeous, incredibly effective covers, these three sort of hit it out of the park. Vintage Classics knows how to package a book is all I can say and I want--no, I need--these three editions in my personal library. Covers, both good and bad, have been on my mind lately and these examples just go to show what magic can happen when you let talented graphic designers who've--wait for it--Read. The. Books. create new, attractive, and inventive covers. All it takes is a glance at the twining roses set against the brick wall backdrop on this cover of North and South to send me into John-and-Margaret raptures. Similarly, the broken windowpane on Wuthering Heights instantly evokes Cathy's ghost calling out his name. As for Jane Eyre, the silhouette is perfect and I want to go re-read it right now. When you get a chance, wander on over and check out their complete catalogue. I'm a particular fan of vintage Dracula

Comments

  1. I love that cover for North and South! The only one of those three books that I've read is Jane Eyre. I should probably read more classics, but there are just too darn many books to read! Sometimes I feel overwhelmed. There are worse problems to have, though. :)

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  2. That North and South cover really is too perfect isn't it? Need. Want.

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  3. I just bought a copy of North and South, and of course saw this one after the fact. Grr. But Vintage is doing some great things cover-wise! (I'm totally wanting Gormenghast, which I've yet to read, based on their cover alone.)

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  4. Those are beautiful covers! I want them :)

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  5. I think these vintage covers are fantastic. Long time fans will want these on their shelves, but really... what a way to capture the attention of some new readers of the classics, don't you think?

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  6. I love the Jane Eyre cover - I don't know, this sounds dumb, but there's something so relatable about a silhouette of Jane with her hair all messy that way. (Because my hair is always messy!)

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  7. Brenda, it really is too perfect. And I hear ya. The sheer volume of books I've never read overwhelms me all the time.

    Michelle, so do I. So. Do. I.

    Chelle, grrr. Sorry! I ended up gazing at so many of their titles. Lovely stuff.

    Heather, I know. The booklust...it grows.

    Christine, exactly! They work so well on so many levels. I would have loved them as much at 17 as I do now.

    Jenny, not dumb at all! It's so Jane. And so human. Yet still beautiful.

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