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Angie's Best Books of 2019

It is the last day of the year. How are you doing at this point? You good to go on? I'm going to. For a number of important reasons, which are too varied (or possibly too private) to enumerate here. So how about we say we shall go on because: "Gansey. That's all there is." I find that "Because Gansey" is highly motivating when motivation is thin on the ground.

Also thin on the ground have been my posts this year. And yet, I'm still not stopping. And I still greatly enjoy arriving at this final post of the year. And so here I leave my best books of the year. It wound up being a respectable nineteen titles this year. Nineteen for 2019. That's down a fair bit from last year's whopping twenty-eight, but rather on par with previous years' lists and more than 2016 and 2017, respectively. I'm pleased. I'm pleased with every book on this list, with every one of the books you shared with me and the ones I've been able to share with you. I have a small handful of people I get to talk books with in person. But my reading life is so vast and colorful because I am privileged to share it with all of you.

Photo by @aamith
(in the order in which I read them)
Normal People by Sally Rooney

FYI, that's 10 contemporaries, 6 historicals, and 3 fantasies. Of those, 10 are romances, 3 are epistolary, 3 are debut novels, 2 are retellings, and 2 are novellas. Feels about right to me. Feels grand, in fact. 

Best New Discovery of 2019
K.J. Charles
I finally gave into peer pressure (hey there, Chachic) this year and cracked open The Magpie Lord. Thus began a headlong rush through the Charm of Magpies series, followed by basically the rest of K.J. Charles's backlist. And what an excellent time it was. I'm rather sad to be through it all but so looking forward to what she has in store for her readers in the future. But, Lord Crane . . . am I right?
One for sorrow, two for joy
Three for a girl, four for a boy
Five for silver, six for gold
Seven for a secret never to be told
Eight for a letter over the sea
Nine for a lover as true as can be
Biggest Character Crush of 2019
Baz
(Tyrannus Basilton Grimm-Pitch)
dead-cherry-bitch.tumblr.com
I have a problem. Ask anyone. And it's been awhile since it was a vampire, but Rainbow Rowell knows where I live. And where I live is a Baz made of fury, issuing iconic lines with not a single thing in this world to lose.
Go ahead and shoot me. This isn't my favourite shirt.
Book I Reread the Most in 2019
Wayward Son by Rainbow Rowell
See above problem. This book . . . it seems a massive understatement to say that it wrecked me. I couldn't recover. It came at the most perfect time and right after I reread Carry On, and I basically spent entire days and nights weeping on my train ride home, pathetically listening to the book playlist songs and trying and failing to move on. Hence the rereads. Which worked, of course. Which is why Oscar Wilde will always, always be right (about so many things):
If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all."

"Simon Snow, it hurts to look at you when you're this happy. And it hurts to look at you when you're depressed. There's no safe time for me to see you, nothing about you that doesn't tear my heart from my chest and leave it breakable outside my body.
Best Books I Read in 2019 that were Published in a Different Year

Happy New Year!

Comments

  1. Happy New Year Angie! Love that pile of books (and the lists). THE FLATSHARE is on my Kindle, I've heard so many good things!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy New Year, Li! Oh, definitely give THE FLATSHARE a shot. It's ridiculously charming.

      Delete
  2. The Flatshare was my favourite read of last year too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's just one of those charmers. I can't imagine not liking it.

      Delete

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