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Angie’s Best Books of the Decade

I am winded, you guys. Winded from laboring over this list. This is the first time I've attempted to cobble together a Best Books of the Decade list, and I can't say I'll be up to it for another ten years or so. But my, I couldn't resist the challenge (or profound pleasure, if we're being honest). I kept trying to winnow it down, kept forcing myself to be ruthless. Like somehow I could (or should) keep it to a top ten (flat impossible) or at least a top twenty-five (who are we kidding?). But after bidding those constraints good riddance, I really did press myself to take a hard, clear look at what hurts (to mangle my favorite Hemingway quote). Because these novels hurt in the best way. Each entry on this list is a five-star book in my books. Which means I wouldn't change a single thing about a single one of them. They are the ones I call perfect when I recommend them to friends and strangers. They are the ones I have read and reread over the past ten years and smiled at every word, at every character I love with every piece of my crooked heart. It seems more than likely that the appearance of most of the books on this list will surprise none of you, while it's possible that one or two just might. Either way, it is a fact that these books are the most Angie books that were originally published in the last ten years, and I love them to distraction. In almost all cases, I've linked to my review of each book, in case you curiouser and curiouser about any individual title. And with that, here they are broken down by year, and within each year I've listed them in roughly the order in which I read them.

2010

2011

2012

2013
Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018
Bridge of Clay by Markus Zusak

2019
Call Down the Hawk by Maggie Stiefvater

That's 47 titles representing ten years. Not too shabby, I'd say. Most years have about five books each. Interestingly, 2018 has the highest number at seven books that year, while 2014 came in at just one book. None of you will be surprised to see that the author with the most books on my list (six) is Maggie Stiefvater followed by Rainbow Rowell with four. V.E. Schwab and Sherry Thomas both have three books apiece, and Madeline Miller, Leigh Bardugo, and Jenny Colgan each have two. I'm pretty sure all the other authors appear once.

As for genres, the list includes 13 contemporaries, 12 historicals, 11 retellings/adaptations, 10 fantasies, 8 urban fantasies, 6 romances, 4 debut novels, and 1 dystopian. Notably, there are also 4 complete series, which makes me smile widely.

Phew. So would any of these precious-to-me books make your Best of the Decade list?
And which others would absolutely be on your list? 

Comments

  1. I love lists of people's favorite books. There are some great books here. In fact, too many to name are my own favorites also. I have to say that a book not on your list, that made my decade, is Ellen Emerson White's The Road Home, which I read because of your blog.

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    1. So do I! And I'm so happy that we share a number of favorites, Misti. The Road Home is just one of the books closest to my heart, and it delights me to no end that you found it here and loved it, too. I kept this list to books originally published between 2010 and 2019. Otherwise, I would ABSOLUTELY have included it. Because Rebecca and Michael. I mean.

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  2. I was just thinking of this very topic on New Years Eve. Conspiracy of Kings and Circe are definitely on my list too. Also Troubled Waters by Sharon Shinn, which I also think is probably my most re-read book of the decade. Great list!

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    1. That's so fun about Troubled Waters! I enjoyed that one, too. Gosh, I love a solid reread. In fact, now I want to make a list of the books I reread the most in the last decade. Lol!

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  3. I love this!! Conspiracy of Kings was my favourite MWT book (omg someone hold me for Return of the Thief). Rainbow Rowell's books would be all over mine, as would Melina Marchetta. And I'm so happy to see The Demon's Covenant on there, nothing I don't love about those Reeves brothers :') What a good decade of books, Angie! It's really nice to see that your blog is still active, I always love your book recommendations. Happy new year!

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    1. It was SO good. I just love the ending, too. I need to read more Marchetta. Jellicoe Road is so perfect. The Reeves brothers . . . they just kill me. I'm due for a reread, in fact. Thanks so much, Audrey! Happy New Year!

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  4. Some great reads on your list! I love Sarah Addison Allen and Eleanor and Park amongst others. And Eleanor Oliphant was one of my favourite recent reads. Maybe I've got a thing about Eleanors.

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    1. Yes, Sarah Addison Allen and Eleanor & Park are so beautiful. I'm interested to see what SAA writes next. It's been a bit since her last. Eleanor Oliphant was just so much more than I was expecting when I cracked it open. I recommend it all the time.

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  5. Fantastic list. Thanks for reading my post too. Of course we share all the Maggie's! I have you to thank for introducing me to her.

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    1. Of course, JoLee! Maggie. <3 No one writes like she does.

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  6. I love your recommendations, as I'm sure I've said many times! The only one I haven't read from this list is The Q, and I'm hoping it goes into read multiple times pile. I found Unraveled through you, though I'd read Courtney Milan's Brothers Sinister series first. And it's one I reread over and over, especially when I'm feeling low. Also on the plane when I'm overcome with antsiness and boredom.

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    Replies
    1. I'm so glad, Elizabeth! The Q is wonderful, so I hope it works for you as well.

      Unraveled is just one of those endlessly comforting rereads, isn't it? In fact, I think I'm about due for one.

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